PostgreSQL github.com

A webdev platform built entirely in PostgreSQL

Aquameta is a web-based IDE for full-stack web development. Developers can manage HTML, CSS, Javascript, database schema, views, templates, routes, tests and documentation, and do version control, branching, pushing, pulling, user management and permissions, all from a single web-based IDE. In theory. And mostly in practice. Under the hood, Aquameta is a “datafied” web stack, built entirely in PostgreSQL. The structure of a typical web framework is represented in Aquameta as big database schema with 6 postgreSQL schemas containing ~60 tables, ~50 views and ~90 stored procedures. Apps developed in Aquameta are represented entirely as relational data, and all development, at an atomic level, is some form of data manipulation. Also in theory. And mostly in practice. This is super experimental, but what a cool idea. Eric Hanson’s been at it it off-and-on for 20 years now…

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Hired Icon Hired – Sponsored

Is your salary competitive?

Hired’s 2019 State of Salaries Report reveals key trends to help answer the questions that are top of mind for tech talent today such as: Where is the next up and coming tech hub? Is my salary competitive? And, what are my tech skills really worth? If you’ve ever asked yourself questions like these and you’re looking for your next big career move, then join Hired and get the 2019 State of Salaries Report delivered directly to your inbox. It reveals key trends to help answer questions like these that are top of mind for today’s technical talent. Get the data and answers to questions that are top of mind for today’s tech talent, plus more when you join Hired - the #1 career marketplace for Software Engineers. Join Hired.

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Kubernetes learnk8s.io

How do you rollback deployments in Kubernetes?

You should have a plan to roll back releases that aren’t fit for production. In Kubernetes, rolling updates are the default strategy to release software. In a nutshell, you deploy a newer version of your app and Kubernetes makes sure that the rollout happens without disrupting the live traffic. However, even if you use techniques such as Rolling updates, there’s still risk that your application doesn’t work the way you expect it at the end of the deployment. Kubernetes has a built-in mechanism for rollbacks. Learn how it works in this article.

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curl blog.benjojo.co.uk

You cannot cURL under pressure 😰

The scope creep of cURL is also something to behold, the program can do tons of stuff! Just look at the home page! With cURL having this many features (with the general mass of them being totally unknown to me, let alone how you use them) got me thinking… What if you could do a game show style challenge for them? I couldn’t make it past the DELETE request (stage 3) without consulting Manuel. How far can you get?

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Keavy McMin keavy.com

Thriving on the technical leadership path

Keavy McMinn: The management path isn’t the only way to be a technical leader. I don’t wish to become a manager; I tried it briefly (73 days to be exact, I counted) and decided managing other people wasn’t where my passion lies. I like being an engineer. In particular, I flourish in a strategic technical leadership role. This used to be hard to accomplish. It still is, but it used to be, too. 😏 Hopefully we see more engineers like Keavy thriving without having to make the switch to management. Writing about it, talking about it, and showing success stories is a good start towards that end.

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GitPrime Icon GitPrime – Sponsored

20 patterns to watch for in your engineering team

20 Patterns is a collection of work patterns GitPrime has observed in working with hundreds of software teams. Each chapter provides actionable and straightforward advice on how to respond to various work patterns as they arise. As I read this, I could picture the engineers I’ve worked with: those who helped level up their team, those who made our codebase more maintainable, and those who may have caused more problems than they solved. This book will be wildly helpful as engineering managers look for opportunities to coach and celebrate their teammates. —Lara Hogan, Engineering Leadership Coach and Consultant at Wherewithall Learn more and download the book.

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Teresa Man heydesigner.com

How to design delightful dark themes

Everyone loves a good dark theme. But what’s the recipe for getting a dark theme right? When creating a dark theme, it can be tempting to invert our light theme. However, distant surfaces would become light and near surfaces would become dark. This would break physicality and feel unnatural. Instead, take only the main surface color of your light theme. Invert this color to produce the main surface color of your dark theme. Lighten this color for nearer surfaces, and darken this color for distant surfaces.

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Mozilla Icon Mozilla

Firefox's new WebSocket inspector

The WebSocket Inspector is part of the existing Network panel UI in DevTools. It’s already possible to filter the content for opened WS connections in this panel, but till now there was no chance to see the actual data transferred through WS frames. This is rad. It’ll ship to all Firefox users in version 71, but it’s available in Firefox Developer Edition today.

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Mike McQuaid mikemcquaid.com

Getting financial support from your users

Mike McQuaid shared some background on the approaches they’ve taken (and their pros and cons) to make Homebrew financially sustainable. For predictable donations we set up the standard (at the time at least): a Patreon account. We offered nothing in exchange for donations but to told people we were an entirely volunteer-run project. … We show users a one-time message on first install or on a Homebrew update to tell them we needed donations and where and how to do so. As soon as this message rolled out we saw a huge jump on donations eventually settling between $2500-$3000 a month on Patreon…

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freeCodeCamp Icon freeCodeCamp

So long Meetup, and thanks for all the pizza

Meetup hiked their prices in a way that shifts the burden off the organizers and on to the participants. They’ve received enough blow back from this change that it wouldn’t surprise me if they adjust (or revert) course, but it may be too late. The open source community is already on the move. This will be a self-hosted Docker image that you can one-click deploy to the cloud, then configure through an admin panel. No coding required. Quincy and the freeCodeCamp team don’t have much more than a README and a schema right now, but objects in motion tend to stay in motion. It’s a great time to jump in and contribute. ✊

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Gene Kim itrevolution.com

Love letter to Clojure (part 1)

Gene Kim shared part 1 of a “love letter to Clojure” inspired by Bryan Cantrell’s amazing “I’m falling in love with Rust” blog post in September 2018 In this blog post, I will explain how learning the Clojure programming language three years ago changed my life. It led to a series of revelations about all the invisible structures that are required to enable developers to be productive. … Without doubt, Clojure was one of the most difficult things I’ve learned professionally, but it has also been one of the most rewarding. It brought the joy of programming back into my life. For the first time in my career, as I’m nearing fifty years old, I’m finally able to write programs that do what I want them to do, and am able to build upon them for years without them collapsing like a house of cards, as has been my normal experience.

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Philip Walton philipwalton.com

Cascading cache invalidation

Turns out one of our asset caching best practices (content hashes in filenames + far-future expiry) has a serious flaws in it: In practice, changes to one of your source files almost always invalidates more than one of your output files—and this happens because you’ve added revision hashes to your filenames. Philip goes on to explain why this happens and then proposes 3 possible solutions. Good stuff 👌

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