Suz Hinton Avatar The Changelog #288  – Pinned

Live coding open source on Twitch

Suz Hinton joined the show to talk about live coding open source on Twitch. We talk about how she got interested in Twitch, her goals and aspirations for live streaming, the work she's doing in open source, Twitch for open source, how you and others can get started — and maybe some other fun stuff we have in the works at Changelog.

logged by @adamstac 2018-03-17T07:06:38.519399Z permalink #streaming #practices

Yegor Bugayenko

Fluent interfaces are bad for maintainability

Yegor Bugayenko: Fluent interface, first coined as a term by Martin Fowler, is a very convenient way of communicating with objects in OOP. It makes their facades easier to use and understand. However, it ruins their internal design, making them more difficult to maintain. A few words were said about that by Marco Pivetta in his blog post Fluent Interfaces are Evil; now I will add my few cents. Yegor uses his own HTTP library as an example where the interface designed is fluent (which looks nice and readable to use) and shows how that design goal made the internal code a mess. My gut tells me it's worth the trade-off to provide a better user experience, but Yegor's real-life experience punches me right in the gut: Fluent interfaces are perfect for their users... However, the damage they cause to object design is the price, which is too high. He suggests decorators and smart objects as an alternative. Lots to ponder here, and the conversation going on in the comments is lively as well. 👌

logged by @jerodsanto 2018-03-19T13:52:00.10850Z permalink #oop #practices

Dimitri Fontaine

Database modeling anti-patterns 🙅‍♀️

Dimitri Fontaine shares 3 classic data-modeling anti-patterns. The UUID section lacks strong argumentation, but the real gem in this article is his advice at the end. A snippet: My advice is to always normalize your database model first, and then only fix the problems you have with that when you actually have them. Well except in those 3% of cases where really, really, it should be done in the design phase of the project. It’s quite hard to recognize those 3% though, and that ability is hard gained with experience. Experience is the ultimate teacher.

logged by @jerodsanto 2018-03-18T22:24:00.008452Z permalink #database #practices

Rust Icon

An open source Spotify client running as a UNIX daemon

Spotifyd streams music just like the official client, but is more lightweight, and supports more platforms. Spotifyd also supports the Spotify Connect protocol, which makes it show up as a device that can be controlled from the official clients. There was previously a spotifyd written in C, but apparently Spotify killed the library it used, so they had to rewrite from scratch. ¯\(ツ)/¯

logged by @jerodsanto 2018-03-18T12:05:00.10090Z permalink #rust

Linode Icon Linode – Sponsored

Linode's block storage service is live

Linode Block Storage allows you to create and attach additional storage volumes to your Linode instances. These storage volumes persist independently of Linode instances, but can easily be attached from one Linode to another without the need to reboot. The Block Storage service is available now in us-west/Fremont region only. us-east/Newark will be online in the next few weeks, with us-central/Dallas online shortly after. We’re aiming to have eu-west/London, eu-central/Frankfurt, ap-south/Singapore, and ap-northeast/Tokyo2 online later this year. Use this link OR use the code changelog2018 to get a $20 credit.

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Cloudflare Blog Icon Cloudflare Blog

Everyone can now run JavaScript on Cloudflare with service workers

Cloudflare gave Kenton Varda a mission — Make it so developers could run code on Cloudflare's edge. Kenton Varda, writes on the Cloudflare blog: Eventually, we settled on what now seems the obvious choice: JavaScript, using the standard Service Workers API, running in a new environment built on V8. Five months ago, we gave you a preview of what we were building, and started the beta. Today, with thousands of scripts deployed and many billions of requests served, Cloudflare Workers is now ready for everyone.

logged by @adamstac 2018-03-18T05:07:45.66820Z permalink #javascript

Medium Icon Medium

You’re not lazy

The subtitle here should have been “We’re all very !#$@%#$ afraid”. The reason I often hold back from doing something or when I self-sabotage a goal — the real reason is because I’m afraid of what will happen if this thing is actually successful??! Then, I’ll have to actually do it. 😱 John Gorman, writes for Personal Growth on Medium: Fear doesn’t manifest itself like you think, because often times we don’t give it the chance to. Fear isn’t always the sweaty palms that stop us cold in a job interview — fear is generally what prevents us from applying in the first place. Spend 8 minutes and read this.

logged by @adamstac 2018-03-16T17:29:15.836089Z permalink #practices

Ashley McNamara Medium

Building bridges to GopherCon 2018

Ashley McNamara is doing a series of fundraisers starting now and ending on July 1st. The goal is to raise money for GoBridge and WomenWhoGo — two organizations who make it their mission to educate & empower underrepresented communities. I can't wait to see how many of these tees the community will be wearing at GopherCon later this year. I'm imagining a sea of Gophers rocking these shirts!

logged by @adamstac 2018-03-16T16:24:00.836913Z permalink #go #culture

Gliffy Icon Gliffy – Sponsored

Create and collaborate on UML diagrams online

Our friends at Gliffy make UML diagram creation and collaboration online super easy. Everything is done on the web to make collaboration easy Drag and drop shapes or use templates for AWS and other networking and database objects Share diagrams easily and choose who can view, edit, or comment Integrates with Atlassian so you can create and collaborate directly in Jira and Confluence Import and edit existing UML diagrams or export your creations Learn more or get started in Atlassian Marketplace

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project Icon

Bitwise – learn by creating the software/hardware for a computer from scratch

Per Vognsen has started live streaming daily while he builds a computer from scratch. The backstory: After working as a game developer and systems programmer for over 15 years at places like Epic Games, NVIDIA, RAD Game Tools and most recently Oculus, I decided it was time to take a break from professional programming and spend a few years pursuing a long-time dream of mine, a project I've dubbed Bitwise, where I want to share my passion and try to demonstrate by example how to build systems from scratch, with a low-level computing focus. Sounds super cool, but also overwhelming. Did he really say, "spend a few years"? For a project that ambitious, you gotta have goals: My goal with Bitwise is to show that these things can be done much more simply and quickly than people realize if we strongly favor simplicity over marginal gains in feature completeness or performance. The goal is not to outdo or compete with any existing product; the goal is to show how things work with real hardware and software. I'm sold. I subscribed us to his Twitch channel and look forward to following along!

logged by @jerodsanto 2018-03-16T16:13:00.013424Z permalink #learn #streaming

Awesome Lists Icon

Explore the peer-to-peer web with Beaker

This repo hosts a curated list of websites and apps that run in the Beaker Browser. Is Beaker new to you like it was to me? Here's its pitch: Beaker is a peer-to-peer browser with tools to create and host websites. Don't just browse the Web, build it. If you've been following the podcast for awhile, you know I've been intrigued by the recent efforts around decentralization. The thing I keep saying to people in th space is, "this stuff is too hard for people to use." Perhaps Beaker is a first step toward making the decentralized web user-friendly...

logged by @jerodsanto 2018-03-16T14:28:00.012378Z permalink #awesome #p2p

Manuel Vila freeCodeCamp

Let’s fix the good old command line

Manuel Vila: We are using more and more command-line tools, and while many of them are really good, I think they could be even better if they were based on more modern foundations. Because our tools are based on ancient paradigms (*nix, Bash, etc.), it's difficult for them to be both customizable and easy to use. After working for a year trying to solve this problem, he came up with "resources", which he says: brings an object-oriented interface to the command-line tools, making them a lot more flexible, composable, and user-friendly. The curmudgeon in me immediately thought, "old dog ... new tricks", but Manuel has a reply ready: I am well aware that I am not going to change 50 years of old practices by myself. It has to be a collective effort. So I'm trying to communicate as much as I can to find the few people crazy enough to join the adventure. Are you "crazy enough" to go on the adventure with him? Click through to find out more.

logged by @jerodsanto 2018-03-16T13:20:00.013224Z permalink #cli

GitLab Blog Icon GitLab Blog

How working at GitLab has changed my view on work and life

Hazel Yang, on the GitLab blog shares insights about her last two years working at GitLab: Show gratitude Learn from failure Trust your team and grow with them Befriend managers and colleagues Embrace diversity I'm a HUGE fan of the concept of a "retrospective" which is most known by developers as a practice of agile software development. It is important to look back and review what's going well, what's not going well, and what needs to change or be stopped all together. This post is a product of that type of discipline.

logged by @adamstac 2018-03-15T20:24:37.434906Z permalink #culture #practices

Nikita Sobolev DEV

I am a mediocre developer

Nikita Sobolev outlines why they're a self-described "mediocre developer" and how they survive in such a state. What follows is a bunch of excellent advice on practical steps toward success as a developer. Ironically, Nikita's self-professed mediocrity and clear path toward defeating it makes them an outstanding developer in my eyes. 🤩 Go and do likewise.

logged by @jerodsanto 2018-03-15T14:41:00.051419Z permalink #practices #culture

The Verge Icon The Verge

The new Raspberry Pi has 5 GHz Wi-Fi and Bluetooth 4.2

Paul Miller with a good breakdown of what’s new (and what’s not) in the latest Raspberry Pi: The new board has a slightly faster 1.4 GHz quad-core processor, Bluetooth 4.2 (an upgrade from 4.1), and dual-band Wi-Fi. Sounds like an incremental upgrade, but progress nonetheless. It never ceases to amaze me how much value they cram in to these things for just $35. And so cute!

logged by @jerodsanto 2018-03-15T13:40:00.11250Z permalink #raspberry-pi

Zach Leatherman

Eleventy - a simpler static site generator

When Zach isn’t going on and on about web fonts, he’s making great open source software. His newest project, Eleventy, has successfully renewed my interest in static site generators. It feels much more intuitive than I remember Jekyll being (it’s been a few years) and the fact that it supports many different template engines makes it easy to jump in. Zach was also recently awarded an Open Source Peer Bonus from Google for his work on Eleventy.

logged by @cody 2018-03-14T20:55:00.010604Z permalink #javascript

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