The Changelog The Changelog #421  – Pinned

The future of Mac

We have a BIG show for you today. We’re talking about the future of the Mac. Coming off of Apple’s “One more thing.” event to launch the Apple M1 chip and M1 powered Macs, we have a two part show giving you the perspective of Apple as well as a Mac app developer on the future of the Mac.

Part 1 features Tim Triemstra from Apple. Tim is the Product Marketing Manager for Developer Technologies. He’s been at Apple for 15 years and the team he manages is responsible for developer tools and technologies including Xcode, Swift Playgrounds, the Swift language, and UNIX tools.

Part 2 features Ken Case from The Omni Group. Ken is the Founder and CEO of The Omni Group and they’re well known for their Omni Productivity Suite including OmniFocus, OmniPlan, OmniGraffle, and OmniOutliner – all of which are developed for iOS & Mac.

Jaana Dogan Medium

What did I forget by working for the same company?

Jaana Dogan, now working at AWS, reflects on her (long) time at Google:

My time was up for one exact reason. I no longer had no clue what the life outside Google felt like. My actual superpower was gone. I remember sitting in meetings only bringing insights from what I hear from customers without truly understanding how things worked outside of our bubble end-to-end.

Thoughtful reflection is a powerful tool in your life. Sharing that reflection with others, like Jaana does here, can be a powerful tool in other people’s lives. 💪

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GitHub github.com

An uptime monitor and status page powered by GitHub Actions

Okay this is pretty stinkin’ clever.

  • GitHub Actions is used as an uptime monitor
    • Every 5 minutes, a workflow visits your website to make sure it’s up
    • Response time is recorded every 6 hours and committed to git
    • Graphs of response time are generated every day
  • GitHub Issues are used for incident reports
    • An issue is opened if an endpoint is down
    • People from your team are assigned to the issue
    • Incidents reports are posted as issue comments
    • Issues are locked so non-members cannot comment on them
    • Issues are closed automatically when your site comes back up
    • Slack notifications are sent on updates
  • GitHub Pages are used for the status website
    • A simple, beautiful, and accessible PWA is generated
    • Built with Svelte and Sapper
    • Fetches data from this repository using the GitHub API

TypeScript github.com

Tips for performant TypeScript

From Microsoft’s TypeScript wiki on GitHub:

There are easy ways to configure TypeScript to ensure faster compilations and editing experiences. The earlier on these practices are adopted, the better. Beyond best-practices, there are some common techniques for investigating slow compilations/editing experiences, some common fixes, and some common ways of helping the TypeScript team investigate the issues as a last resort.

Matt Klein changelog.com/posts

My secret to building Envoy's community

Envoy’s open source community is amazing. I looked the other day, and at least on GitHub, just from a code contribution perspective, we’re almost at 600 contributors. Which for a fairly low-level C++ project… that is freakin’ incredible. It just blows my mind. And then you look at all of the vertical products and all these other things that are built on top…

There are many factors that contributed to this success, but one thing I did early on stands out as the most important thing I could’ve done. In this post I share my secret with you.

Practical AI Practical AI #113

A casual conversation concerning causal inference

Lucy D’Agostino McGowan, cohost of the Casual Inference Podcast and a professor at Wake Forest University, joins Daniel and Chris for a deep dive into causal inference. Referring to current events (e.g. misreporting of COVID-19 data in Georgia) as examples, they explore how we interact with, analyze, trust, and interpret data - addressing underlying assumptions, counterfactual frameworks, and unmeasured confounders (Chris’s next Halloween costume).

DigitalOcean Icon DigitalOcean – Sponsored

Free Python machine learning projects ebook

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As machine learning is increasingly leveraged to find patterns, conduct analysis, and make decisions — sometimes without final input from humans who may be impacted by these findings — it is crucial to invest in bringing more stakeholders into the fold.

This a free book of Python projects in machine learning from Lisa Tagliaferri and Brian Boucheron (DigitalOcean) tries to do just that: to equip the developers of today and tomorrow with tools they can use to better understand, evaluate, and shape machine learning to help ensure that it is serving us all.

Founders Talk Founders Talk #73

Balancing business and open source

Raj Dutt is the founder and CEO of Grafana Labs. Grafana has become the world’s most popular open source technology used to compose observability dashboards (we use Grafana here at Changelog). Raj and team are 100% focused on building a sustainable business around open source. They have this “big tent” open source ecosystem philosophy that’s driving every aspect of building their business around their open source, as well as other projects in the open source community. But, to understand the wisdom Raj is leading with today, we have to go back to where things got started. To do that we had to go back like Prince to 1999…

Go roland.zone

Benchmarking the M1 with the Go standard library

We are in a time where the open source tooling and developer story around Apple’s new M1 chip is all over our feeds. Among these was this interesting benchmark. It even highlights where a somewhat older Intel can still beat the M1, such as highly optimized crypto. In general, if your code relies on the Go parts more than native optimized code the M1 looks like a performance win.

Go github.com

Maddy – a composable all-in-one mail server

Maddy Mail Server implements all functionality required to run an email server. It can send messages via SMTP (works as MTA), accept messages via SMTP (works as MX) and store messages while providing access to them via IMAP. In addition to that it implements auxiliary protocols that are mandatory to keep email reasonably secure (DKIM, SPF, DMARC, DANE, MTA-STS).

It replaces Postfix, Dovecot, OpenDKIM, OpenSPF, OpenDMARC and more with one daemon with uniform configuration and minimal maintenance cost.

IMAP storage is still in beta, but this is one to watch as it could dramatically simplify your infrastructure.

Russ Cox github.com

Russ Cox's experimental new refactoring tool for Go

It’s just 18 commits deep at the time of logging, but when one of Go’s authors fires up a new project (and a refactoring tool at that), it’s worth following along to see what develops.

Just how raw is this effort? The README only states:

rf is an experimental refactoring tool. It is very much a work in progress. rf is incredibly rough and likely to be buggy and change incompatibly.

I gave the repo a quick cloneing to see what I could see, but go get failed due to a missing file reference so it’s definitely in a “wait and see” status unless you’re up for some hacking.

Productivity zwbetz.com

Attention is my most valuable asset for productivity as a software developer

Zachardy Wade Betz with some deep thoughts on how he’s most productive:

My high-level workflow looks something like this: identify the problem to solve; think on the problem and let ideas percolate; research, discuss, and experiment with these ideas; implement and test the solution; deliver and maintain the solution.

This cycle could repeat many times in a day. Or I could spend days stuck on a single cycle step. Every step in this cycle requires attention. The more attention I can devote, the more cycles I can complete, and the more productive I am.

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