EFF Icon EFF

Enough of the 5G hype

Ernesto Falcon, writing for the EFF: [wireless carriers] are only trying to focus our attention on 5G to try to distract us from their willful failure to invest in a proven ultrafast option for many Americans: fiber to the home, or FTTH. He goes on to break down why 5G won’t solve many of our (USA) problems and why it’s better to ignore the hype and ask why we’re falling behind other areas of the world.

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Rust swc-project.github.io

swc – like Babel, but 16-20 times faster (because Rust)

You can install swc (the speedy web compiler) from npm just like you’re used to, which will download a pre-built binary. That only works on mac (x64)/linux (x86_64)/win32-x64. For other environments, you’ll need the Rust nightly build. Supports ES 2019, JSX, and TypeScript out of the box. You might want to jump straight to the migrating from Babel section. 😉

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GitPrime Icon GitPrime – Sponsored

Scaling engineering teams from 5 to 500 and beyond

Every high-growth engineering organization eventually needs to tackle the challenges around restructuring teams, maintaining a productive culture, building resilient systems, and adjusting engineering processes. This free webinar from our friends at GitPrime will include discussions around: How to organize engineering teams for innovation and velocity at scale Lessons learned and best practices for developing effective engineering processes Strategies for building and maintaining a healthy culture that drives focus and motivation Attend on February 28th to hear from panelists at WeWork, Box, and Pivotal on critical lessons learned and best practices for keeping teams aligned and productive at scale. Panelists: Randy Shoup (VPE at WeWork), Cornelia Davis (Sr. Director of Technology at Pivotal), Saminda Wijegunawardena (VPE at Box)

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Practical AI Practical AI #30

GirlsCoding.org empowers young women to embrace computer science

Chris sat down with Marta Martinez-Cámara and Miranda Kreković to learn how GirlsCoding.org is inspiring 9–16-year-old girls to learn about computer science. The site is successfully empowering young women to recognize computer science as a valid career choice through hands-on workshops, role models, and by smashing prevalent gender stereotypes. This is an episode that you’ll want to listen to with your daughter!

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Linux Journal Icon Linux Journal

If software is funded from a public source, its code should be open source

Perhaps because many free software coders have been outsiders and rebels, less attention is paid to the use of open source in government departments than in other contexts. But it’s an important battleground, not least because there are special dynamics at play and lots of good reasons to require open-source software. Public money should produce public code, full stop. That doesn’t seem controversial to me, but it’s definitely easier to say than it is to execute.

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Data visualization tweag.io

Mapping a universe of open source software

The repositories of distributions such as Debian and Nixpkgs are among the largest collections of open source (and some unfree) software. They are complex systems that connect and organize many interdependent packages. Is it possible to capture the large scale features of such a repository in an image? Are there common design choices of the contributors? Did they lead to any emergent structure? This work resulted in some beautiful (and interesting) visualizations. Here’s a sneak peak 👇

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Bits and Pieces Icon Bits and Pieces

Understanding Service Workers and caching strategies

Solid tutorial on Service Workers: You can think of the service worker as someone who sits between the client and server and all the requests that are made to the server pass through the service worker. Basically, a middle man. Since all the request pass through the service worker, it is capable to intercept these requests on the fly.

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JavaScript eslint.org

Funding ESLint’s future

ESLint began as a side project 6 years ago and has grown into the most popular JavaScript linter in the world with over 6.5 million npm downloads every week. In short, we’ve realized that in order for ESLint to continue to grow and evolve, we need to get more organized and set up a way to fund ESLint’s development going forward. Today, we are happy to announce the ESLint Collective on Open Collective. Support ’em if you got ’em

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Brandon Gomez cnbc.com

The current business model of Patreon is not sustainable

Jack Conte, the founder of Patreon, said the following in a report from Brandon Gomez on cnbc.com regarding Patreon’s sustainability as it relates to their recent rapid growth: The reality is Patreon needs to build new businesses and new services and new revenue lines in order to build a sustainable business. This thread from Dan Olson on Twitter is worth reading. It started off with this Tweet: I don’t want to be doom and gloom, but Patreon is about to eat itself. Or, more specifically, the investors who demand geometric growth are about to demand Patreon eat itself. I take particular interest in their revenue which is estimated at $55M versus the $107M of venture capital raised and how that relates to sustainability and the choices founders make on their journey to succeed and/or survive.

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Dan Abramov overreacted.io

React as a UI runtime

At a 37 minute read time, this post from Dan Abramov on using React as a programming runtime is near book length and will give you a deeper understanding of React “than 90% of its users.” We’ve touched on pretty much all important aspects of the React runtime environment. If you finished this page, you probably know React in more detail than 90% of its users. And there’s nothing wrong with that!

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Klaus Sinani github.com

Qoa – minimal interactive command-line prompts

Lightweight and without any external dependencies qoa enables you to receive various types of user input through a set of intuitive, interactive & verbose command-line prompts. The library utilizes a simple & minimal usage syntax and contains 7 configurable console interfaces, such as plain text, confirmation & password/secret prompts as well as single keypress, quiz & multiple-choice navigable menus.

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Patrick Reynolds githubengineering.com

GitHub open sourced the parser and specification for GitHub Actions

If you’re looking for a deep dive on GitHub Actions, check out The Changelog #331: GitHub Actions is the next big thing with Kyle Daigle. Patrick Reynolds, writing on the GitHub Engineering blog: Since the beta release of GitHub Actions last October, thousands of users have added workflow files to their repositories. But until now, those files only work with the tools GitHub provided: the Actions editor, the Actions execution platform, and the syntax highlighting built into pull requests. To expand that universe, we need to release the parser and the specification for the Actions workflow language as open source. Today, we’re doing that. I also want to point out this “we believe” section of the post to key in on their intentions and willingness to provide the community with the necessary tools to make GitHub Actions all that it can be for the community. We believe that tools beyond GitHub should be able to run workflows. We believe there should be programs to check, format, compose, and visualize workflow files. We believe that text editors can provide syntax highlighting and autocompletion for Actions workflows. And we believe all that can only happen if the Actions community is empowered to build these tools along with us. That can happen better and faster if there is a single language specification and a free parser implementation.

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Gianluca gianarb.it

Extend Kubernetes via a shared informer

This post from Gianluca Arbezzano contains both theory and code with a complete working application to understand how to build your own shared informer to extend Kubernetes beyond applying YAML via kubectl. Kubernetes increases in popularity every day but I don’t think we use all its power just applying YAML via kubectl. Kubernetes is a framework and as every framework, it exposes powerful interfaces and API usable to extend its capability with our needs. Shared Informers are what I see as the easy way to enjoy k8s as an extendible tool to programmatically build and ship containers.

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Sara Soueidan sarasoueidan.com

Migrating from Jekyll and GitHub Pages to Hugo and Netlify

Sara Soueidan: My site is relatively small, I’d say. I have less than 100 blog posts. Less than 60 at the time of writing of this article, actually. And only a few static pages. I don’t use heavy JavaScript. In fact, I barely need to use any JavaScript. And yet, Jekyll still choked every time it had to compile it. I’ve seen more and more people jump ship from Jekyll due to performance. Paul Robert Lloyd migrated over to Eleventy, even I’m contemplating something else. Interestingly enough, the static site generator comparisons mostly have to do with developer ergonomics because they all essentially do the same thing: output static HTML.

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Jeff McAffer mcaffer.com

Open source engagement in organizations

Jeff McAffer (the Director of Microsoft’s Open Source Programs Office) says you can plot their course in open source quite closely in the model he describes in this post. A few years ago they were in denial about the open source movement. Today it’s a different story with 20,000 Microsoft folks activity working on GitHub. Companies, governments, and other organizations big and small are working with open source to achieve their goals. Teams range from barely considering it to betting their whole business on open source. Putting some structure on this spectrum has helped me think about and evolve Microsoft’s open source program. I’d love to hear if you find it useful, how, or why not. If you run, participate in, lead, or you are curious about open source programs you should read this.

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Tom Barrasso hackernoon.com

Dear Javascript, "this" isn't working...

Are you frustrated with the growing complexity of Javascript and front-end tooling? Read this creative break-up letter from Thomas Barrasso. Here’s an excerpt: We stayed up late at night, holding requests for what felt like hours. You took it to 4 billion places I never thought it could go. In my mind, you had no equal. People thought we were crazy. I could hardly await to escape callback hell because with you, nothing was out of scope. We prototyped one great framework after the next, never stopping to wonder why. Thomas decided to write this break-up letter “as a means of exploring my frustration with both the language and ecosystem.”

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Filip Borkiewicz 0x46.net

Dotfile madness

Solid rant: My own home directory contains 25 ordinary files and 144 hidden files. The dotfiles contain data that doesn’t belong to me: it belongs to the programmers whose programs decided to hijack the primary location designed as a storage for my personal files. I can’t place those dotfiles anywhere else and they will appear again if I try to delete them. Let’s see here, in my $HOME directory: ls -l | wc -l # => 18 vs ls -la | wc -l # => 114 96 hidden files! I guess it’s never really bothered me, but that is definitely excessive. To those of you reading this: I beg you. Avoid creating files or directories of any kind in your user’s $HOME directory in order to store your configuration or data. This practice is bizarre at best and it is time to end it. What do you think, is this a real issue or just a pet peeve?

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