Jon Rohan GitHub

Using Figma to build Octicons

Jon Rohan writes on the GitHub Blog: To support your project’s contributors it’s important to make the contributing experience as frictionless as possible. Migrating our Octicons to Figma let us cut out painful steps in our previous workflow. Having their API available for automating the work has allowed contributors to contribute using powerful platform-agnostic design tools without any overly complex setup. This seems to be one of the first major steps I've seen to use a platform-agnostic design tool like Figma, which lets you design, prototype, and gather feedback all in a browser based design tool. Couple that with a robust API and some robots to automate things as well as open up your design flow to contributors.

read more...

Henry Zhu DEV

I wasn't ready to become the maintainer of Babel

I wasn't ready to become the maintainer of Babel. After all, I had never published my own npm package or explored much of the codebase. But slowly (sometimes really slowly) I got used to it. I recall Kent C. Dodds saying that if you want to be a maintainer, just act like and do the things a maintainers does. Sounds easy enough 🤣. I particularly enjoyed the linked post on imposter syndrome from Rachel Smith.

read more...

Kishin Yagami lambstatus.github.io

LambStatus – a serverless status page system

Why is serverless a good fit for status page systems? According to the author: It eases your pain caused by the scaling / availability issues. It is terrible if your service is down AND heavy traffic from stuck users stops your status page. It enables you to pay only for what you use. A status page only occasionally gets huge traffic. The system takes only $1 per 30,000 visitors and almost $0 if no visitors. Makes sense to me. 💯

read more...

GoCD Icon GoCD – Sponsored

Why should you use GoCD over Jenkins?

Jekins is the incumbent, not to mention, the open source option here. But GoCD is open source as well. You just might not have heard about it yet… GoCD provides its core value out of the box. Maybe you will add a few integration plugins to make GoCD fit better in your environment. Jenkins will require many plugins to deliver value. You will need to understand the plugins, how they interoperate, and how to upgrade them. GoCD will feel more stable. Jenkins will feel more hackable. Which is a better match to your needs and philosophy? Learn how to setup your first pipeline OR check out their enterprise plugins and support.

read more...
logged by @logbot permalink

Jeremy Keith A List Apart

Going offline

Jeremy Keith in an excerpt from his new book Going Offline on A List Apart: The internet is a network of networks, all of them agreeing to use the same protocols to shuttle packets of data around. Those packets are transmitted down fiber-optic cables across the ocean floor, bounced around with Wi-Fi or radio signals, or beamed from satellites in freakin’ space. As long as these networks are working, the web is working. But sometimes networks go bad… When the network fails, the web fails. That’s just the way it is, and there’s nothing we can do about it. Until now. I'm really excited to see Jeremy Keith write a whole book on service workers. I've dabbled a bit here and there, but now that support for them continues to grow, I'm excited to dive in.

read more...

Philipp Krenn Avatar The Changelog #292

Elasticsearch and doubling down on "open"

Philipp Krenn joined the show to talk with us about Elasticsearch, the problem it solves, where it came from, and where it's at today. We discussed the query language, what it can be compared to, whether or not it's a database replacement or a database complement, Elasticsearch vs Elastic the company. We also talked about the details behind Elastic's plan of "doubling down on open" to open up X-Pack, which is open code paid add-on features to Elasticsearch. We discussed the implications of this on their business model, and what changes will take place at the code and license level on GitHub.

read more...

Mozilla Icon Mozilla

How healthy is the Internet?

Mozilla has released their annual Internet Health Report: Our 2018 compilation of research explains what’s helping and what’s hurting the Internet across five issues, from personal experience to global concerns. The five issues are decentralization, digital inclusion, openness, privacy/security, and web literacy. There's a lot to digest here. We should expect conversations around these findings to blossom the next few weeks. We might even need to do a show about it...

read more...

CSS-Tricks Icon CSS-Tricks

Keep pixelated images pixelated as they scale

Chris Coyier: We're quite used to the idea that scaling an image larger than its natural size (upscaling) causes it to be blurry. As awful as that is, it's the browser doing the best it can to algorithmically smooth out an image over more pixels than it has data. But let's say you'd really rather not it do that. Say the image is already pixel-y (pixel art), or you prefer the look of a pixelated upscaling. You can do it! File this one in the “I had no idea this existed” category. Really simple CSS trick, but definitely a useful one.

read more...

Mislav Cimperšak github.com

An Awesome™ List of useless and funny dev projects

I bet everybody has heard about popular lists such as awesome-python, awesome-shell, awesome-cms and such and find them incredibly valuable. Well... Awesome Dev Fun list is on the other side of that spectrum. It's a curated list of awesome funny libs/packages/languages that have no real value or purpose but to make a developer chuckle. If we can't have fun (and poke fun at ourselves), what's the point of it all? Also this list is embarrassingly short, y'all. Gentlepeople, fire up your PR engines...

read more...

 Itamar Turner-Trauring codewithoutrules.com

You are not your tools

Itamar hits the nail on the head: If you think of yourself as a Python programmer, if you identify yourself as an Emacs user, if you know you’re better than those vim-loving Ruby programmers: you’re doing yourself a disservice. You’re a worse programmer for it, and you’re harming your career. I've been preaching the gospel of generalization for many years. This industry moves fast. Today's new hotness is tomorrow's old and busted. Learn specific skills, yes. But always keep yourself above the fray. I am not a Rails Developer. I am not an Elixir Guy. Heck, I don't even consider myself a web developer. I solve problems; sometimes by writing software. Back to Itamar: The technologies you use, the tools you build with, are just that: tools. Learn to use them, and learn to use them well. But always remember that those tools are there to serve you, you are not there to serve your tools.

read more...
0:00 / 0:00