Productivity letterstoanewdeveloper.com

Cultivate the skill of undivided attention, or “deep work”

Dear New Developer,

You know that there’s a chasm between your skill level and that of the mythical “senior software developer”.

If you build a list of topics you encounter on your job that, if learned to a deep enough level, would put you on the same level as a senior developer, you’ll end up even more demoralized than before compiling that list.

No need to assemble this list yourself! I’ve done it for you.

I’ve heard many people recommend Deep Work over the years. Add this one to the list.

(I like this style of writing where you imagine a hypothetical new developer –knowing full well they real thing is out there– and tell them things you wish you’d known when starting your career as a dev.)

Go Time Go Time #123

WFH

Working from home can be challenging, especially amid school closings and everything else caused by COVID-19. In this episode panelists Jon, Mat, Carmen, and Mark share advice and experiences they have accumulated over many years of working from home. They cover separating your work space from your personal space, signaling to your family that you are busy, ways to keep track of the time, and suggestions for getting some exercise in when you can.

Go blog.golang.org

Go and the Go community during this pandemic

In this post Carmen Andoh, Russ Cox, and Steve Francia share important notes about how the pandemic is affecting the Go community, what they’re doing to help, what you can do to help, and upcoming plans for Go itself.

Go always comes second to more basic concerns like personal and family health and safety. Around the world, the past couple months have been terrible, and we are still at the start of this awful pandemic. There are days when it seems like working on anything related to Go should be considered a serious priority inversion.

But after we’ve done all we can to prepare ourselves and our families for whatever is coming, getting back to some approximation of a familiar routine and normal work is a helpful coping mechanism. In that spirit, we intend to keep working on Go and trying to help the Go community as much as we can.

Mux Icon Mux – Sponsored

How to host your own online conference

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Everyone is self-quarantined and working remotely. Now what? Well, now you have to take your conference online. But how?

The basic structure of your setup is going to be a live conversation that is broadcast to a larger group of live viewers. The live conversation could be something like one person presenting with a screen share, or one person interviewing someone else, or a panel discussion among a group of experts.

A really simple way to do this live conversation is to use Zoom. Adding Mux in the middle is how you can broadcast your Zoom call to an audience of thousands on your own website. The live audience does not have to download Zoom, they do not interact with Zoom at all. All they do is see a video player that you make on your website.

How to host your own online conference

O'Reilly Media Icon O'Reilly Media

O’Reilly Media shuts down in-person events division

From Laura Baldwin (President, O’Reilly Media):

Today, we’re sharing the news that we’ve made the very difficult decision to cancel all future O’Reilly in-person conferences and close down this portion of our business. Without understanding when this global health emergency may come to an end, we can’t plan for or execute on a business that will be forever changed as a result of this crisis.

…and they are making the move to online-only.

…we believe the stage is set for a new normal moving forward when it comes to in-person events. We also know we are poised to accept that challenge, having already delivered a version of our Strata event on-line to over 4600 participants last week. With over 5000 companies and 2.5 million users on our learning platform, we look forward to innovating and bringing together the technology communities and businesses we serve in new and creative ways.

Brain Science Brain Science #14

Memory and learning

Mireille and Adam discuss the process of forming memories, the various types of memory, anxieties, phobias, panic attacks, and how our attention and our memory relates to learning. Where you place your attention influences what you might remember. What you are able to remember influences how you feel, the choices you make, and your future outcomes.

The Changelog The Changelog #387

Prepare yourself for Quantum Computing

Johan Vos joined us to talk about his new book ‘Quantum Computing for Developers’ which is available to read right now as part of the Manning Early Access Program (MEAP). Listen near the end of the show to learn how you can get a free copy or check the show notes for details. We talked with Johan about the core principles of Quantum Computing, the hardware and software involved, the differences between quantum computing and classical computing, a little bit of physics, and what can we developers do today to prepare for the perhaps-not-so-distant future of Quantum Computing.

Feross Aboukhadijeh cs253.stanford.edu

Stanford CS253: Web Security

Hey folks! Feross from JS Party here. I taught a course on web security last quarter at Stanford. All the course materials, slides, and videos are freely available online and I wanted to share with the broader community, in case anyone is interested in learning more about secure web programming.

The course goal is to build an understanding of the most common web attacks and their countermeasures. Given the pervasive insecurity of the modern web landscape, there is a pressing need for programmers and system designers improve their understanding of web security issues. We’ll be covering the fundamentals as well as the state-of-the-art in web security.

Daniel Stenberg daniel.haxx.se

Curl's CLI can now write out JSON

This does not mean curl can fetch some JSON and print it to STDOUT. That would not be new. What it means is that the --write-out option now supports JSON as an output format. Pipe that output to a tool like jq and you get something like this:

{
  "url_effective": "https://example.com/",
  "http_code": 200,
  "response_code": 200,
  [lots more but I snipped them for length]
}

Which is pretty cool, if you ask me.

PostgreSQL 2ndquadrant.com

Opinion: PostgreSQL is the world's best database

The title is not clickbait or hyperbole. I intend to prove that by virtue of both design and implementation that PostgreSQL is objectively and measurably a better database than anything currently available, with or without money considerations.

He goes on to detail 15(ish) reasons why Postgres stands out from the crowd. A compelling argument. I’d love to see similar write-ups by people who disagree.

Practical AI Practical AI #82

Speech recognition to say it just right

Catherine Breslin of Cobalt joins Daniel and Chris to do a deep dive on speech recognition. She also discusses how the technology is integrated into virtual assistants (like Alexa) and is used in other non-assistant contexts (like transcription and captioning). Along the way, she teaches us how to assemble a lexicon, acoustic model, and language model to bring speech recognition to life.

Data visualization gabgoh.github.io

An interactive epidemic calculator

This calculator lets you tweak things like R0, incubation time, and hospitalization rate to see how affect the results. From the author:

At the time of writing, the coronavirus disease of 2019 remains a global health crisis of grave and uncertain magnitude. To the non-expert (such as myself), contextualizing the numbers, forecasts and epidemiological parameters described in the media and literature can be challenging. I created this calculator as an attempt to address this gap in understanding.

An interactive epidemic calculator

Cloudflare Icon Cloudflare

The history of the URL

I love internet history articles like this one from Cloudflare:

On the 11th of January 1982 twenty-two computer scientists met to discuss an issue with ‘computer mail’ (now known as email). Attendees included the guy who would create Sun Microsystems, the guy who made Zork, the NTP guy, and the guy who convinced the government to pay for Unix. The problem was simple: there were 455 hosts on the ARPANET and the situation was getting out of control.

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