Nikola Đuza pragmaticpineapple.com

Improving your Vim workflow with fzf

Did you know that this fuzzy finder - fzf, can do a lot more than you thought? Oh yeah, the fuzzy search is just the tip of the iceberg here. It is like wine; the more you leave it on your computer, the more flavor and sweetness it accumulates from that command-line. Let’s dive in and find out how you can increase your productivity with fzf inside Vim.

Sam Soffes soffes.blog

Homebrew on Apple Silicon

Sam Soffes:

Today, my new 13-inch MacBook Pro arrived! I was super excited to get it out of the box and set it up. This thing is fast! I am already very impressed. When I started setting up my development environment, things started to get a little frustrating. Have no fear, it’s solvable!

The biggest issue for me was Homebrew. According to this issue “There won’t be any support for native ARM Homebrew installations for months to come.” No big deal though. Homebrew can work just fine with Rosetta 2 and some things work natively.

DigitalOcean Icon DigitalOcean – Sponsored

Free Python machine learning projects ebook

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As machine learning is increasingly leveraged to find patterns, conduct analysis, and make decisions — sometimes without final input from humans who may be impacted by these findings — it is crucial to invest in bringing more stakeholders into the fold.

This a free book of Python projects in machine learning from Lisa Tagliaferri and Brian Boucheron (DigitalOcean) tries to do just that: to equip the developers of today and tomorrow with tools they can use to better understand, evaluate, and shape machine learning to help ensure that it is serving us all.

Jussi Pakkanen nibblestew.blogspot.com

The 9 phases of an open source project maintainer

Running an open source project is more than just writing code. Jussi Pakkanen says “…most of all work has to do with something else,” which if you listen to The Changelog, our Maintainer Spotlight series, or Request for Commits then you know this all too well.

This places additional requirements to project maintainers that are often not talked about. In this post we’ll briefly go over nine distinct phases each with a different hat one might have to wear. These can be split into two stages based on the lifetime and popularity of the project.

Rust blog.servo.org

Servo’s new home

The Servo Project is excited to announce that it has found a new home with the Linux Foundation. Servo was incubated inside Mozilla, and served as the proof that important web components such as CSS and rendering could be implemented in Rust, with all its safety, concurrency and speed. Now it’s time for Servo to leave the nest!

The project’s governance has also changed. It now has a board and a TSC (technical steering committee). They’ve also set up their community/chat on Zulip, which is new to me and looks… interesting.

Practical AI Practical AI #112

Building a deep learning workstation

What’s it like to try and build your own deep learning workstation? Is it worth it in terms of money, effort, and maintenance? Then once built, what’s the best way to utilize it? Chris and Daniel dig into questions today as they talk about Daniel’s recent workstation build. He built a workstation for his NLP and Speech work with two GPUs, and it has been serving him well (minus a few things he would change if he did it again).

Productivity github.com

The Tomboy note-taking application is still alive

Around the same time I started using Ubuntu I found Tomboy and it was a note-taking system unlike anything else I’d ever used. To me it was the great differentiator for the Linux desktop for a bit. It is a desktop-wiki that provides some incredibly interesting concept. I thought it had quietly passed away but it turns out it has been ported to a new stack and lives a good life with support for Mac and Windows under the Tomboy NG name.

The Tomboy note-taking application is still alive

The Changelog The Changelog #420

The Kollected Kode Vicious

We’re joined by George Neville-Neil, aka Kode Vicious. Writing as Kode Vicious for ACMs Queue magazine, George Neville-Neil has spent the last 15+ years sharing incisive advice and fierce insights for everyone who codes, works with code, or works with coders. These columns have been among the most popular items published in ACMs Queue magazine and it was only a matter of time for a book to emerge from his work. His book, The Kollected Kode Vicious, is a compilation of the most popular items he’s published over the years, plus a few extras you can only find in the book. We cover all the details in this episode.

Security securitylab.github.com

How to get root on Ubuntu 20.04 by pretending nobody’s /home

Kevin Backhouse:

I am a fan of Ubuntu, so I would like to help make it as secure as possible. I have recently spent quite a bit of time looking for security vulnerabilities in Ubuntu’s system services, and it has mostly been an exercise in frustration…

This blog post is about an astonishingly straightforward way to escalate privileges on Ubuntu. With a few simple commands in the terminal, and a few mouse clicks, a standard user can create an administrator account for themselves. I have made a short demo video, to show how easy it is.

This particular vulnerability is regarding the GUI, so your Ubuntu servers are unaffected. Still, 👀

Juli Clover macrumors.com

Apple's M1 chip is outperforming the 16-inch MacBook Pro

Juli Clover via MacRumors.com on Apple’s M1 chip performance:

When compared to existing devices, the M1 chip in the ‌MacBook Air‌ outperforms all iOS devices. […] In comparison to Macs, the single-core performance is better than any other available Mac, and the multi-core performance beats out all of the 2019 16-inch MacBook Pro models, including the 10th-generation high-end 2.4GHz Intel Core i9 model.

No, we don’t normally link up Mac performance benchmarks. In fact, I think this is a first. But we’ve been nerding out in #applenerds on Slack…and we’re just days away from the “Future of Mac” episode on The Changelog — so, the performance and benchmarks of the M1 chip are on my mind.

Keep in mind that the M1 is Apple just getting started with Mac chips. Look at the image below and you will see the M1 is running at 3.2 GHz — a faster clock speed than all other Macs on the list.

Apple's M1 chip is outperforming the 16-inch MacBook Pro

Twitter Icon Twitter

Guido van Rossum comes out of retirement, joins Microsoft

Guido van Rossum:

I decided that retirement was boring and have joined the Developer Division at Microsoft. To do what? Too many options to say! But it’ll make using Python better for sure (and not just on Windows :-). There’s lots of open source here. Watch this space.

Late last year Guido left Dropbox to head into retirement. Apparently “retirement was boring.” I’m curious to see how coming out of retirement changes things at the steering level of Python.

We talked mid last year with Brett Cannon about Python’s new governance and core team. I don’t recall their plan accounting for the possibility for their BDFL to come back from retirement. 😱

I’m sure whatever is to come for Python with Guido being back, it’ll be a net positive.

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