Erik Kennedy learnui.design

Designing for iOS and Android

From Erik Kennedy who shared some tactical design advice for developers — this awesome visual guide covers the primary differences between designing for iOS and Android, including navigation, UI controls, typography, app icons, and more. If you’re designing both an iOS and an Android (Material Design) version of an app, this guide is your new best friend 😎. We’re going to cover the most relevant differences between iOS and Android for UX/UI designers. If you’ve created an app on one platform, this is most of what you need to know to “translate” it for the other platform.

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Segment Icon Segment – Sponsored

Measuring the impact of 95,000 landing pages

When you’re a cash-strapped nonprofit and you have to compete for attention against multi-billion dollar public companies, you have to get creative with growth. This is how Upsolve produced high-quality landing pages focused on topics related to their audience and then complemented those with “programmatic locality-specific landing pages” based on data from Segment’s Identities feature. Of the content we’d produced, only ~10% of our conversions were coming from our editorial articles while ~70% were coming from state and city page templates (created programmatically). Based on the data we saw in Personas, we all quickly saw where our growth was coming from and devoted the time previously set aside for editorial toward improving the quality of our programmatic content. It’s been so successful, we’ve now created over 95,000 landing pages!

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Node.js github.com

The largest Node.js best practices list

With 35k+ stars, I might be the last one to the party on this awesome repo. It is the largest compilation, and it is growing every week - currently, more than 80 best practices, style guides, and architectural tips are presented. New issues and pull requests are created every day to keep this live book updated. We’d love to see you contributing here, whether that is fixing code mistakes, helping with translations, or suggesting brilliant new ideas.

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Practical AI Practical AI #64

Robot hands solving Rubik's cubes

Everyone is talking about it. OpenAI trained a pair of neural nets that enable a robot hand to solve a Rubik’s cube. That is super dope! The results have also generated a lot of commentary and controversy, mainly related to the way in which the results were represented on OpenAI’s blog. We dig into all of this in on today’s Fully Connected episode, and we point you to a few places where you can learn more about reinforcement learning.

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Jerod Santo changelog.com/posts

5 things Rob Pike attributes Go's success to

As the saying goes… history doesn’t repeat itself, but it often rhymes. If you want to create a successful programming language (or at least understand how you might), it’s immensely valuable to learn from others who have done just that. on Go Time episode #100, two of Go’s creators (Rob Pike and Robert Griesemer) sat down to discuss the language’s success. Here’s 5 things they attribute to its success.

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The Changelog The Changelog #368

Finding collaborators for open source

Jeff Meyerson, host of Software Engineering Daily, and the founder of FindCollabs (a place to find collaborators for open source software) joined the show to talk about living in San Francisco, his thoughts on podcasting and where the medium is heading, getting through large scale market changes. We talk at length about his new project FindCollabs, the difficulty of reliably finding people to collaborate with, the importance of reputation and ratings systems, and his invite to this audience to check out what he’s doing and get involved.

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DigitalOcean Icon DigitalOcean – Sponsored

How to build and install Go programs

From the how to code in Go series on DigitalOcean’s Community site from our friends at Gopher Guides (Mark Bates & Cory LaNou). In Go, the process of translating source code into a binary executable is called building. Once this executable is built, it will contain not only your application, but also all the support code needed to execute the binary on the target platform. This means that a Go binary does not need system dependencies such as Go tooling to run on a new system, unlike other languages like Ruby, Python, or Node.js.

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Devon Zuegel GitHub Blog

GitHub Sponsors is out of beta

Earlier this week GitHub Sponsors came out of beta to general availability for developers with bank accounts in 30 countries (and growing). Also, check out the companion video celebrating some of the developers of GitHub Sponsors. Next steps? This is just the beginning for native sponsorships on GitHub. We’re working hard to build out great sponsorship experiences around the world.

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JS Party JS Party #100

11 awesome lightning chats ⚡️

What you’re about to hear is a series of lightning chats recorded live from All Things Open 2019. How’s this for topic diversity? 👇 A/B testing, finding your tribe, dancing, TikTok, what is happening with front-ends becoming full-stacks, Code the Dream, OSI approved licenses, breaking in to tech, a11y, hiring juniors, whiteboard interviews, better interview practices, JPGs, coding bootcamps, tech re-entry programs, and more.

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Browser London Icon Browser London

The power of the MoSCoW method

I’ve never heard of this method before, but it’s definitely interesting enough to link up for you: At its core, the MoSCoW method is simply a prioritization framework that can be applied to any kind of situation or project, but it works best when a large number of tasks need to be ruthlessly whittled down into a prioritised and achievable to-do list. The general idea is you take a list of tasks/stories/whatevs and place each into one of for buckets: Must, Should, Could, and Won’t. (Somehow this gets shortened to MoSCoW for the namesake.) If you listened to our recent episode on Agile, you know I’m not a fan of ceremony when it comes to planning practices, but I do think there is some value here if you do it right. Click through for the skinny on how to run a MoSCoW exercise as well as some pitfalls to avoid.

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npm github.com

npm adds `fund` subcommand to help support maintainers

As of npm 6.13, maintainers can add a funding field to their package.json (which works very much like GitHub’s FUNDING.yml) and users can run npm fund to see how they can support their dependency authors. Darcy Clarke had this to say about the feature on npm’s blog: Post install you will now see output that describes the number of packages that have defined funding information. You can opt-out of this prompt by using the –no-fund flag if you so choose. At the end of August, we made a promise to the community to invest time & effort to better support package maintainers. This work is just the first, small step toward creating a means/mechanism for a more sustainable open source development ecosystem.

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The Changelog The Changelog #367

Back to Agile's basics

Robert C. Martin, aka Uncle Bob, joined the show to talk about the practices of Agile. Bob has written a series of books in order to pass down the wisdom he’s gained over his 50 year software career — books like Clean Architecture, Clean Code, The Clean Coder, The Software Craftsman, and finally Clean Agile — which is the focus of today’s discussion. We cover the origins of his “Uncle Bob” nickname, the Agile Manifesto, why Agile is best suited for developing software, how it applies today, communication patterns for teams, co-location vs distributed, and more importantly Bob shares his “why” for writing this book.

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link Icon changelog.com/posts

GitHub exposes public ssh keys for its users

Thanks for sharing this Postmodern. TIL @github exposes the ssh public keys for users. github.com/defunkt.keys Handy for adding devs to servers/repos.— Postmodern (@postmodern_mod3) February 10, 2013 Today I learned from @postmodern_mod3 that GitHub exposes public ssh keys for its users. For example, if you wanted my public keys: https://github.com/adamstac.keys So never again should you have to ask, “What’s your public ssh key?” You can just curl -O https://github.com/<username>.keys their public keys from GitHub and move on. Although, Rick’s response to that tweet was to not use that method and to use their API to list public keys for a user instead. Discuss the pros and cons of this on Hacker News.

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Cloud blog.trailofbits.com

Algo – your personal VPN in the cloud

The linked article is an excellent introduction to Algo, which is effectively a set of Ansible scripts that set up a Wireguard and IPSEC VPN for you. Algo automatically deploys an on-demand VPN service in the cloud that is not shared with other users, relies on only modern protocols and ciphers, and includes only the minimal software you need. And it’s free. For anyone who is privacy conscious, travels for work frequently, or can’t afford a dedicated IT department, this one’s for you. Algo’s list of features (and anti-features) is compelling and most VPN services are terrible. 👀

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