Brad Fitzpatricktailscale.com

An unlikely database migration

So the Tailscale team were using a single text file as a database (as you do) and it worked great… until it didn’t.

Even with fast NVMe drives and splitting the database into two halves (important data vs. ephemeral data that we could lose on a tmpfs), things got slower and slower. We knew the day would come. The file reached a peak size of 150MB and we were writing it as quickly as the disk I/O would let us. Ain’t that just peachy?

So, migrate to MySQL or PostgreSQL, right? Maybe SQLite?

Nope, Crawshaw had other ideas.

I won’t ruin the surprise and tell you what they went with, but I will say it’s a widely deployed system amongst cloud natives…

Browser London IconBrowser London

Frontend predictions for 2021

Predictions are always fun, especially when we can look back and see how wrong we were. Here’s Browser London’s Jay Freestone laying out where he thinks the frontend is going in 2021:

  1. React frameworks finally mature
  2. We get a glimpse at container queries
  3. WASM explodes
  4. The monolith makes a come back

There’s the predictions. Click through for the Jay’s reasoning.

Retool Icon Retool – Sponsored

The state of internal tools in 2020

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Earlier this year Retool ran a survey of developers and builders on internal tools to learn how people build and maintain their internal tooling. The survey had 310 respondents, mostly in SaaS, Finance, and Retail, and mostly from mid sized (2-500 employees) companies. This report outlines the results and insights they learned.

The tldr is internal tooling is really important, but rarely gets the time and focus they need.

Try Retool today

Practicesbti360.com

What I've learned in 45 years in the software industry

Joel Goldberg recently retired after working in the software industry for over four decades. When he left he shared with our team some of the lessons he learned over his career. With his permission, we reshare his wisdom here.

  1. Beware of the Curse of Knowledge
  2. Focus on the Fundamentals
  3. Simplicity
  4. Seek First to Understand
  5. Beware of Lock-In
  6. Be Honest and Acknowledge When You Don’t Fit the Role

45 years of experience boiled down to just a half dozen insights. Staggering and insightful at the same time.

Electrongithub.com

Turn any device with a web browser to a second screen for your computer

Deskreen is an electron.js based application that uses WebRTC to make a live stream of your desktop to a web browser on any device. It is built on top of Electron React Boilerplate For better security mechanism, end-to-end encryption is implemented, which is inspired bydarkwire.io , the difference is, that it is rewritten in Typescript and transformed to use node-forge instead of window.crypto.subtle.

Turn any device with a web browser to a second screen for your computer

Hardwaregithub.com

Turn your Kindle into a HUD for every day life

David Hamp-Gonsalves created a really cool use for your old Kindle:

Second hand Kindles are waiting in drawers for someone to repurpose them into something great. Boasting large e-ink screens, wifi connectivity and ARM processors they are an amazing hacking platform.

In my case I created an information panel summarizing my day such as my calendar, surf and weather forecast, garbage schedule, school closures, etc. My favorite part is that any extra space is filled with a random Pokémon sprite which my kids(not me) like to come check in on.

Built with Rust plus some serverless backend data collection bits.

Turn your Kindle into a HUD for every day life

Tom Clevelandtjcx.me

I wasted $40k on a fantastic startup idea

I’m not gonna lie, it does sound like a fantastic startup idea. But there are so many things that can go wrong when trying to start something new and Tom Cleveland does a super job of telling that story in this brutally honest post:

Things are going great. My friends and family all tell me they love the site. Even some strangers on the internet love it. “I know right,” I tell them. “So how much would you pay for this?

“Hahahahahahah,” they say in unison. “Good one!”

Stick around to the end for lessons learned. Where did he go wrong?

Austin Gilaustingil.com

Building better forms for the web

An epic 5-part series on building HTML forms right.

Forms are arguably the most important parts of any web application. Without forms, we would not have sites like Google, Facebook, Amazon, Reddit, etc. However, the more I browse the web, the more I see poor implementations of forms.

In this series, we will examine the proper steps to creating forms for the web, how to think about the code we write, and considerations to make along the way.

Austin plans on turning this series into a full-blown book this year, so expect more from him in this arena very soon.

Bashgithub.com

A temporary SMS utility right from your terminal 📥

tmpsms is a command line utility written in POSIX sh that allows you to get a temporary phone number and receive SMSes. It uses Upmasked temporary SMS service in order to receive the messages. This is a very useful tool for those who use are testing applications during bug bounty hunting or just need some privacy and don’t wan’t to use your personal phone number.

I don’t know when I’d ever use this, but I love that it’s POSIX compliant and depends on just a few other CLI tools (curl, jq, and fzf).

A temporary SMS utility right from your terminal 📥

WebAssemblygithub.com

Impossibly fast web search (made for static sites)

Stork is two things. First, it’s an indexer: it indexes your loosely-structured content and creates a file that you can upload to your web server. Second, it’s a JavaScript + WebAssembly frontend for that index file: Stork will hook into an <input> on your web page, download the index you’ve specified, and display the best search results immediately to your user, as they type. The precomputed index and WebAssembly frontend module make the entire Stork engine very good, and very fast.

Impossibly fast web search (made for static sites)

Tom Critchlowtomcritchlow.com

Why can't I write code inside my browser?

What would happen if browsers came pre-installed with Node.js, an IDE, and a simple runtime environment?

…there’s been a kind of revolution around coding. “Javascript everywhere” (i.e. node.js) has really become the default web-development paradigm. Javascript is alluring - partly because every computer has a javascript GUI and runtime - the browser! You can code in javascript on your computer using a text editor and a browser - without ever touching the command line!

But, what if a full-fledged dev environment for JavaScript was just as ubiquitous as the runtime in the browser?

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