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Julia Evans

Julia Evans jvns.ca

A little bit of plain JavaScript can do a lot

Julia Evans:

I was pretty surprised by how much I could get done with just plain JS. I ended up writing about 50 lines of JS to do everything I wanted to do, plus a bit extra to collect some anonymous metrics about what folks were learning.

Listeners of JS Party know I’m an advocate for JavaScript sprinkles. Not on every site, but on most sites I think that’s the best way to start out.

Now more than ever, you can get a lot done with what’s right there in the browser. Wait until you feel the pain before you solve the problem. Who knows, maybe you’ll never have to…

Julia Evans jvns.ca

How tracking pixels work

A fun, quick dive into Facebook’s tracking pixel and how it does its thing:

I think it’s fun to see how cookies / tracking pixels are used to track you in practice, even if it’s kinda creepy! I sort of knew how this worked before but I’d never actually looked at the cookies on a tracking pixel myself or what kind of information it was sending in its query parameters exactly.

Creepy, indeed. Our browsers are the last line of defense against such creepiness. Choose yours wisely.

Julia Evans jvns.ca

SQL queries don't start with SELECT

Yesterday I was working on an explanation of window functions, and I found myself googling “can you filter based on the result of a window function”. As in – can you filter the result of a window function in a WHERE or HAVING or something?

Eventually I concluded “window functions must run after WHERE and GROUP BY happen, so you can’t do it”. But this led me to a bigger question – what order do SQL queries actually run in?

Kind of a snappy headline because Julia is talking about order in terms of execution and most of the time we’re thinking about order in terms of authoring. But still, TIL!

Julia Evans jvns.ca

Not getting your work recognized? Brag about it.

Most people are modest about their contributions in the workplace. We also forget how important our contributions are. Then, when it comes time for recognition, you’ve forgotten, others didn’t notice because they don’t understand all the details and moving parts, and work just moves on. What do you do if/when your work goes unnoticed? Here’s what Julia Evans suggests…

Instead of trying to remember everything you did with your brain, maintain a “brag document” that lists everything so you can refer to it when you get to performance review season! This is a pretty common tactic – when I started doing this I mentioned it to more experienced people and they were like “oh yeah, I’ve been doing that for a long time, it really helps”.

Where I work we call this a “brag document” but I’ve heard other names for the same concept like “hype document” or “list of stuff I did” :).

BONUS — Julia included a basic template for a brag document at the end of the post.

Julia Evans jvns.ca

Open source sabbatical = awesome

Julia Evans has finished up her 3 months of funded work on rbspy (thanks to the Segment Open Fellowship) and wrote up her experience. If you can’t tell from the title, she liked it.

This was an interesting statement coming from Julia (whose reputation amongst developers is impeccable, if you ask me):

Another benefit of doing this was that now I have actual code that I’ve written out in the open on GitHub! I don’t really believe in “github is your resume” (lots of great programmers don’t do any open source work! that’s fine!) but it does feel good to have.

One huge benefit to employees who work for open source-oriented companies is that they get to build an open source portfolio on the job. That levels the playing field for folks who don’t have the luxury of disposable free time outside business hours.

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