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Kyle Carberry Medium

Run VS Code as a cloud-IDE on your own server

If you’ve been wanting a way to run VS Code as a cloud-IDE, code-server is what you’ve been looking for. Code-server allows VS Code to run on a remote server making it fully accessible through the browser. … Developers ready to embrace the cloud-based IDE can do so without losing features, or control. This means you can code on your Chromebook, tablet and desktop with a completely synchronized environment. You can spill coffee on your laptop without fear of losing work.

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Dan Abramov Medium

Why my new blog isn’t on Medium

This post from Dan Abramov about why he moved off Medium summarizes both why we’re no longer linking to Medium and why we’ve never put our content there. Some of my Medium articles unexpectedly got behind a paywall. I’m not sure what happened and whether that’s still the case. But I didn’t do it myself, and that caused a blow to my confidence in Medium as a platform. I respect their need to monetize, but it felt wrong when done retroactively.

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Fernand Galiana Medium

If you K8s, please try K9s...

Operating Kubernetes clusters is becoming more and more taxing in terms of the number of aliases/scripts and single purpose tools one must install/master. K9s is a terminal based CLI to manage and diagnose Kubernetes clusters in a single command. It provides a unified view to navigate and diagnose K8s resources for your local or remote clusters right there in the same CLI.

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Medium Icon Medium

Kubernetes development workflow for macOS (tips and tricks)

Megan O’Keefe, developer relations engineer at Google, shares her setup for Kubernetes as well as some very helpful tips and tricks from her Terminal setup, navigating clusters, and how she gave kubectl superpowers. As a developer relations engineer for Kubernetes, I work a lot with demo code, samples, and sandbox clusters. This can get interesting to keep track of (read: total chaos). So in this post I’ll show some of the tools that make my Kubernetes life a lot better. This environment can work no matter what flavor of Kubernetes you’re running.

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Kent C. Dodds Medium

Every new web app at PayPal begins with TypeScript (here's why)

Kent C. Dodds shares the backstory of paypal-scripts, a tool that encapsulates all the tools common to PayPal applications and published modules and why TypeScript was a fit. Kent took a poll in their #paypal-scripts Slack channel and 100% of respondents said they wanted the change. Here’s what happened next… About a week later, I had totally migrated paypal-scripts from supporting Flow to supporting TypeScript (most of that time was making all the tools recognize .ts and .tsx files 🙄 and allowing paypal-scripts to dogfood itself which is kinda tricky 🐶). … Then we had Christmas break 🎄 and the week we got back after the new year 🎆, it was merged and now every new project starts off with modern tools that will stay updated by default and will be statically typed with TypeScript.

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Medium Icon Medium

Apple succumbs to the smartphone malaise

When was the last time you got REALLY EXCITED about the latest iPhone announcement? It’s been awhile for me too…I mostly get excited about improvements made to the camera. We generally expect newer models to get faster and better, right? So, progress alone makes that an expectation. Everything else is just kinda, meh. From The Economist on Medium: Smartphones revolutionized everything from shopping and dating to politics and computing itself. They are some of the most popular products ever put on sale. But after a decade-long boom, devices once seen as miraculous have become ubiquitous and even slightly boring.

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Omar Bahareth Medium

Lessons learned from a year of fighting with Webpack and Babel

Webpack and Babel are awesome, this article isn’t trying to say otherwise. We wouldn’t be able to use a lot of things if it weren’t for them, but the experience of using them together needs to get better. I faced many of these issues over the course of many months and understanding them/finding solutions was incredibly difficult (error messages don’t exactly tell you what went wrong and searching for them doesn’t always give relevant results), and I hope this article can act as the guide I had hoped to find back then. I love posts these where you take your hard-won learnings and share them with the world in an attempt to save others from the same headaches.

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Mark Bates Medium

My name is Mark and I have mental illness

I just want to say thank you to my friend Mark Bates who shared some deeply personal details about his struggles with a mental illness he suffers from called Obsessive Compulsive Personality Disorder (OCPD). I can only imagine how much courage it took Mark to share this very personal matter with the world. Thank you Mark. As we enter the holiday and end of year season, it’s important for those who are in a state of depression, suffering, or feeling alone to know that you may feel alone, but you are not alone. As Mark said, you don’t have to “suffer in silence.” The first step in getting help is an awareness that there is a problem and a determination to seek help. mentalhealth.gov/get-help — is a great resource for those looking to find that help. If you are with someone whom you believe has a mental illness I offer you this advice: You can help make them aware of their illness, but you can’t make them seek treatment unless they are ready.

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Aaron Turner Medium

WebAssembly vs. ES6 — benchmark battle!

Aaron Turner (UXE at Google) says “WebAssembly is fast” and has conducted a real-world benchmark between WebAssembly and ES6 to showcase Wasm’s performance on different browsers, devices, and cores. …this benchmark will be utilizing the WasmBoy benchmarking tool (source code). The benchmark features three different cores as of today. AssemblyScript (WebAssembly built with the AssemblyScript compiler), JavaScript (ESNext output by the TypeScript compiler), and the previous JavaScript core except run through Google’s Closure Compiler…

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Adam Jacob Medium

We need sustainable free and open source communities

Adam Jacob (co-founder and creator of Chef) tldr’d his ideas to create sustainable free and open source communities by saying, “we should stop focusing on how to protect the revenue models of open source companies, and instead focus on how to create sustainable communities.” He says this will lead to better software, and that it’s also better for business. In addition to this post, Adam also wrote a short book. When I say “Sustainable Open Source Community”, I mean the following: A unified body of individuals, scattered throughout a larger society, who work in support of the creation, evolution, use, and extension of free and open source software; while ensuring its longevity through meeting the needs of the present without compromising the ability of the community of the future to meet its own needs.

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Victor Coisne Medium

An analysis of the Kubernetes codebase

In an attempt to confirm Kubernetes’ move beyond hype to widespread enterprise adoption, Francesc Campoy and Victor Coisne used source{d} Engine to analyze all the Kubernetes git repositories through SQL queries. Here’s a snapshot of what they learned. At its outset in 2014, the Kubernetes project had 15 programming languages, a number that quickly increased to 35 by the beginning of 2017. Given that Kubernetes came from Google, it’s not surprising to see that Go is by far the dominant language followed by Python, YAML and Markdown. The analysis shows that other languages such as Gradle and Lua have been dropped while some others like Assembly, SQL and Java made a comeback. The full results of the analysis are available upon request via a link shared at the end of the blog post.

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Eran Hammer Medium

Why you should consider hapi

Eran Hammer makes the case for hapi as your Node web framework of choice. We’ve been talking about dependencies a lot lately due to recent events. In light of that, think about this: hapi was the first (and still the only) framework without any external code dependencies… I personally (and manually) review every single line of code that goes into hapi (excluding node itself). I review every pull request on every dependency regardless if I am the lead maintainer. That’s quite the selling point! He has a lot of great reasons why hapi is worthy of your consideration. Click through for the hard pitch.

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Medium Icon Medium

Crowdsourcing the evolution of text parsing with unified

unified –for the uninitiated– is an interface for processing text with syntax trees and transforming between them. Maybe you’ve never heard of it, but you’ve probably relied on it as part of your software infrastructure: [unified] has been OSS for years, but has recently gotten more traction. It’s used in fancy technology such as MDX, Gatsby, and Prettier, and used to build things like Node’s docs, freeCodeCamp, and GitHub’s open source guide. Project’s like unified are crucial to the JavaScript ecosystem, but they’re difficult to fund and support toward sustainability. Hence, the unified collective. Today, we are pleased to announce the creation of the unified collective. It’s an effort to bring together like-minded organisations to collaboratively work on the innovation of content through seamless, interchangeable, and extendible tooling. We build parsers, transformers, and utilities so that others don’t have to worry about syntax. We make it easier for developers to develop. Let’s show these maintainers some 💚 and share this around to those who should be supporting it.

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Kevin Owocki Medium

Gitcoin Labs and burner wallets?!

The next big thing for Gitcoin might be coming out of their announcement of Gitcoin Labs. In their words, Gitcoin Labs is “R&D for Busy Developers.” We are excited to expand upon Austin Griffith’s work in the ecosystem, and to formalize it into Gitcoin Labs, which will be a service that provides Research Reports and Toolkits for Busy Developers. Kevin mentioned that they’re “going to continue Austin’s work in the ecosystem” and the first thing listed on their roadmap was “burner wallets”— consider me intrigued.

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Tanya Janca Medium

Why I love password managers

Tanya leads with this as a disclaimer “This article is for beginners in security or other IT folk, not experts.” — which means this is a 101 level post BUT is a highly important topic. Share as needed. Passwords are awful … software security industry expects us to remember 100+ passwords, that are complex (variations of upper & lowercase, numbers and special characters), that are supposed to be changed every 3 months, with each one being unique. Obviously this is impossible for most people. Tanya goes on to say… If you work in an IT environment, you absolutely must have a password manager. I strongly suggest that anyone who uses a computer regularly and has multiple passwords to remember to get one, even if you don’t consider yourself tech savvy. I fully agree. I also use 1Password and have done so for as long as I can possibly remember.

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Addy Osmani Medium

A Netflix web performance case study

Hold on to your seat! This is a deep dive on improving time-to-interactive for Netflix.com on the desktop. Addy Osmani writes on the Dev Channel for the Chromium dev team regarding performance tuning of Netflix.com. They were trying to determine if React was truly necessary for the logged-out homepage to function. Even though React’s initial footprint was just 45kB, removing React, several libraries and the corresponding app code from the client-side reduced the total amount of JavaScript by over 200kB, causing an over-50% reduction in Netflix’s time-to-interactivity for the logged-out homepage. There’s more to this story, so dig in. Or, share your comments on their approach to reducing time-to-interactivity and if you might have done things differently.

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Lee Byron Medium

Introducing the GraphQL Foundation

The Linux Foundation is essentially a foundation for foundations, and the newest member to join the ranks is the GraphQL Foundation. We’ve been tracking news and talking about GraphQL for some time now. Back in 2012 Nick Schrock, Dan Schafer, and Lee Byron got together at Facebook to build the next generation of Facebook’s iOS app powered by a new API for News Feed — what they arrived at was the first version of GraphQL. Lee Byron has this to say about today’s announcement: Today, GraphQL has been a community project longer than it was a Facebook internal project — which calls for its next evolution. As one of GraphQL’s co-creators, I’ve been amazed and proud to see it grow in adoption since its open sourcing. Through the formation of the GraphQL Foundation, I hope to see GraphQL become industry standard by encouraging contributions from a broader group and creating a shared investment in vendor-neutral events, documentation, tools, and support. So who’s involved? Well, GraphQL Foundation is being created in partnership with the Linux Foundation, Facebook, and nearly a dozen other companies. Those “other companies” are likely large scale companies who’ve contributed to or are using GraphQL in production and have a vested interest in its future.

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Medium Icon Medium

Complexity is creepy: It's never just "one more thing."

The fight against complexity is analogous to the fight against contentment. Find contentment and you will find yourself at the end of a project. Hint: we will never be fully content. We live in a dynamic world of infinite, and never-ending change. There will always be a critique to offer. Perfection is an illusion. We’ve all worked on projects that never seem to end. Every time you think you’re done, you realize you’re not. There’s “one more thing” you or your client wants to add. Somehow, you get exhausted and your work suffers. Sometimes you simply burn out and move on to something else. Why does this happen? Why do we consistently underestimate how much extra work it is to do “one more thing?”

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Brad Armstrong Medium

How to fail as a new engineering manager

Brad Armstrong lays it all out there about how to transition from an engineer to a manager: There are decades of books and thousands of blogs dedicated to trying to answer these questions, so I‘m not here to pretend that I’ve got the secret to success. But I do know a few ways that I’m pretty sure can guarantee you’ll fail. He takes you through 8 easy steps to failure. I’ll disappoint you now and spoil that step 1 is to keep coding 😱

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Eric Clemmons Medium

Work on features, not repositories

In response to a recent Twitter poll from Kent C. Dodds, Eric Clemmons shared concerns about how organizational boundaries are impacting where development happens. Kent tweeted… Hey folks who have a decoupled client-server application (no server rendering, server is just an API server). Where is your client code and server code located? (#) Together in one repo? In separate repos? Eric writes in his response on Medium: Software is like Jello: poke it in one place, and another place jiggles. In my experience, a repository should house all of the code necessary to make developing & shipping features relatively frictionless. This isn’t an exact 1:1, but this was a big part of the reason why Segment transitioned back to a monorepo.

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Matt Klein Medium

The (broken) economics of OSS

In response to the post from Paul Dix on the misunderstandings going on around Redis and the Common Clause license — Matt Klein tweeted: Won’t defend Redis Labs, this is a dead end move, but there needs to be more recognition that the economics of OSS are fundamentally broken. In his post he starts by saying… I want to provide a long form discussion of my two Twitter threads as this topic is nuanced and quite interesting. Note: this post is heavy on opinion and light on facts/references backing up those opinions. Thus, preface everything that follows with “IMO.” Matt goes on to share some history of open source software and his opinions on modern expectations of software being free and open, startups and open source, and who pays…

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Josh Comeau Medium

Lessons learned as a conference speaker

How do you develop an idea for a talk, determine the conferences to pitch, actually deliver the talk, and whether or not it’s even worth doing? Joshua Comeau writes on Medium: I’m still very much at the beginning of my career. I’m only ~5 years into what will likely be a 40-year career, so I’m only about 1/8th through! That thought is simultaneously liberating and dizzying; it means I don’t have to feel rushed when it comes to making the most of every available opportunity, but it also means I have no clue what’s ahead. Conference-speaking is a worthwhile endeavor, but it’s one heck of a bumpy ride, and not always worth it. I’ll continue to prepare talks — as long as folks still want to hear what I have to say… Joshua ends with an invitation … 👏 I encourage you to give it a shot. Feel free to reach out to me, I’m always happy to give your proposal a quick read :)

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Paul Johnston Medium

Serverless best practices

If you’re building a serverless application to run at scale, then read this post from Paul Johnston on Medium… Within the community we’ve been debating the best practices for many years, but there are a few that have been relatively accepted for most of that time. Most serverless practitioners who subscribe to these accepted practices work at scale. The promise of serverless plays out mostly at both high scale and bursty workloads rather than at a relatively low level, so a lot of these best practices come from the scale angle e.g. Nordstrom in retail and iRobot in IoT. If you’re not aiming to scale that far, then you can probably get away without following these best practices anyway.

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