Conferences Icon

Conferences

Where developer communities meet
30 Stories
All Topics

YouTube Icon YouTube

JS Danger: OpenJS World Edition

This episode of JS Danger recorded for OpenJS World won’t be hitting the audio feed, so I figured I should log it in news for those interested. What’s JS Danger?

JS Party’s don’t-call-it-jeopardy game show where 3 OpenJS World speakers put their web dev knowledge to the test. Can you out-wit your fellow devs? Play along to find out with special guests Cassidy Williams, Prosper Otemuyiwa, and Tiffany Le-Nguyen.

Opensource.com Icon Opensource.com

The real impact of canceling PyCon due to COVID-19

An interview with Ewa Jodlowska on how the Python Software Foundation is responding to the cancelation of in-person events.

Turns out ~63% of the PSF’s 2020 revenue was projected to come from PyCon. That’s a massive hit to take. Read the entire interview to learn what they’re doing to diversify, some silver linings that have come from this, and how you can pitch in.

(The tail end of Adam’s conversation with Duane O’Brien focused on the FOSS Responders initiative which was purpose-built to help out orgs like the PSF.)

The Changelog The Changelog #375

Gerhard goes to KubeCon (part 2)

Gerhard is back for part two of our interviews at KubeCon 2019. Join him as he goes deep on Prometheus with Björn Rabenstein, Ben Kochie, and Frederic Branczyk… Grafana with Tom Wilkie and Ed Welch… and Crossplane with Jared Watts, Marques Johansson, and Dan Mangum.

Don’t miss part one with Bryan Liles, Priyanka Sharma, Natasha Woods, & Alexis Richardson.

The Changelog The Changelog #374

Gerhard goes to KubeCon (part 1)

Changelog’s resident infrastructure expert Gerhard Lazu is on location at KubeCon 2019. This is part one of a two-part series from the world’s largest open source conference. In this episode you’ll hear from event co-chair Bryan Liles, Priyanka Sharma and Natasha Woods from GitLab, and Alexis Richardson from Weaveworks.

Stay tuned for part two’s deep dives in to Prometheus, Grafana, and Crossplane.

JS Party JS Party #103

You're probably using streams

This week we chat with Matteo Collina, Technical Director at NearForm and member of the Node.js Technical Steering Committee, about his upcoming Node+JS Interactive talk on Node Streams. We talk about their creation before any standards and how they are one of the bedrock APIs used throughout the Node ecosystem. We also talk about WHATWG streams and some of their key differences, and how streams have gotten easier to work with thanks to the addition of async iterators and generators to the language.

freeCodeCamp Icon freeCodeCamp

So long Meetup, and thanks for all the pizza

Meetup hiked their prices in a way that shifts the burden off the organizers and on to the participants. They’ve received enough blow back from this change that it wouldn’t surprise me if they adjust (or revert) course, but it may be too late. The open source community is already on the move.

This will be a self-hosted Docker image that you can one-click deploy to the cloud, then configure through an admin panel. No coding required.

Quincy and the freeCodeCamp team don’t have much more than a README and a schema right now, but objects in motion tend to stay in motion. It’s a great time to jump in and contribute. ✊

Eric Holscher ericholscher.com

Using a Welcome Wagon to help first-time conference attendees

Eric told us a little bit about this idea on this year’s OSCON episode, and I’m so glad he took the time to write it up. Conference organizers: steal this idea!

At Write the Docs, we’re working to make the community easier to join because we want everyone to feel welcome. We do this with the Welcome Wagon program, which helps attendees at both the planning and the attending stages of the conference. We hope that this breaks down barriers to help them get the most value from our community.

Founders Talk Founders Talk #65

What are you optimizing for?

Saron Yitbarek is the founder and CEO of CodeNewbie — one of the most supportive community of programmers and people learning to code. Saron hosts the CodeNewbie podcast, Command Line Heroes from Red Hat, and she’s also the creator of Codeland Conference taking place on July 22 this year in New York City. We talk through getting started, lessons learned, mental health, developing and running a conference…but our conversation begins with a pivotal question asked of Saron…“What are you optimizing for?”

Practical AI Practical AI #45

How to get plugged into the AI community

Chris and Daniel take you on a tour of local and global AI events, and discuss how to get the most out of your experiences. From access to experts to developing new industry relationships, learn how to get your foot in the door and make connections that help you grow as an AI practitioner.

Then drawing from their own wealth of experience as speakers, they dive into what it takes to give a memorable world-class talk that your audience will love. They break down how to select the topic, write the abstract, put the presentation together, and deliver the narrative with impact!

Don Goodman-Wilson maintainerati.org

Reviving Maintainerati

I missed this good news announced back in March…“We’re putting the band back together.” I’m glad to hear that we can now look forward to more Maintainerati events.

…one important thing we learned is that maintainers need to have access to others who are sharing the same experiences, struggles and successes they have while running an open source project.

In response to this, GitHub has reached out to some passionate people in the broader maintainers community to help bring some structure and growth to Maintainerati, in the shape of a new core team to run Maintainerati events and organize the community.

Josh Comeau Medium

Lessons learned as a conference speaker

How do you develop an idea for a talk, determine the conferences to pitch, actually deliver the talk, and whether or not it’s even worth doing? Joshua Comeau writes on Medium:

I’m still very much at the beginning of my career. I’m only ~5 years into what will likely be a 40-year career, so I’m only about 1/8th through! That thought is simultaneously liberating and dizzying; it means I don’t have to feel rushed when it comes to making the most of every available opportunity, but it also means I have no clue what’s ahead.

Conference-speaking is a worthwhile endeavor, but it’s one heck of a bumpy ride, and not always worth it. I’ll continue to prepare talks — as long as folks still want to hear what I have to say…

Joshua ends with an invitation … 👏

I encourage you to give it a shot. Feel free to reach out to me, I’m always happy to give your proposal a quick read :)

André Staltz staltz.com

Your IDE as a presentation tool

André Staltz:

I’ve just given my third programming talk where I use only my IDE (integrated development environment) for live coding and no other presentation tool. I noticed the audiences were very pleased with these talks, and I think it’s correlated to using an IDE and not a slides program.

If you’ve ever watched one of André’s talks, you know he gives good talks regardless of whether or not he’s using an IDE. But he makes a good case for their use in general and goes in to great detail* on how to do it well.

*even explaining each individual editor setting and why they were selected

0:00 / 0:00