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Styling the web and views since 1996.
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Adam Wathan adamwathan.me

How Tailwind CSS became a multi-million dollar business

Adam Wathan shares the backstory of Tailwind CSS, from humble beginnings to a multi-million dollar business. Thankfully, if you read the story, Nathan hated Sass enough to do something about it. Sometimes changes to our tools force us to change as well, and that change JUST MIGHT lead to scratching a multi-million dollar itch.

We’re also about to cross $2 million in revenue from Tailwind UI, our first commercial Tailwind CSS product which was released about 5 months ago — a bit under two years after the very first Tailwind CSS release.

Here’s the story from the beginning, while it’s still fresh enough to remember…

Andy Bell piccalil.li

CUBE CSS — Composition Utility Block Exception

Andy Bell recently shared his new CSS methodology oriented towards simplicity and consistency with “a heavy dosage of pragmatism.”

If there’s one thing you can guarantee in tech, it’s that someone, somewhere, will declare that CSS isn’t up to the job of “big projects” and what will undoubtedly be recommended by those same people will be either a JavaScript-heavy approach or some sort of all-in utility class approach like Tailwind.

The problem is, a huge number of projects are websites, so that advice normally doesn’t work for the vast majority of developers. For context, it’s estimated that WordPress powers around 36% of the internet and is still rising. Compare that to a paltry 0.3% of websites that use React, for example. It’s important to keep those figures in mind.

If you’re deep in CSS, you’ll want to read the whole post. Andy goes on to explain the methodology and how he writes CSS, then wraps up saying…

This isn’t a heavily documented, complex methodology. Well, not now, anyway. It’s more of a concept method of organizing CSS just enough to not pull to far away from the “classic” way of writing it. Really, it’s more of a thinking structure.

Learn amberwilson.co.uk

CSS tips for new devs

A delightful list of 24 tips that Amber dubs as “for new devs”, but I’ll just go ahead and scratch the new out of there and it still fits the bill.

CSS expertise comes with time! While CSS is easy to start with and gives you immediate visual results, mastering it takes time and this is perfectly okay 😃. It is the same for everyone.

CSS github.com

Preview minimal CSS frameworks with this drop-in switcher

Minimal CSS “frameworks” are on the rise. There are so many of them now that it’s hard to compare apples to apples. This’ll help.

This is a quick drop-in CSS switcher to allow for previewing some of the many minimal CSS-only frameworks that are available. See the demo or drop the switcher into your own page to see how different frameworks would look together with your content.

This project only includes minimal frameworks, in other words, boilerplate / classless frameworks that require no adjustment of the corresponding HTML and can be simply dropped into the project to provide a starting point for further design. No additional javascript, compiling, pre-processors, or fiddling with classes should be required for these to look good and be responsive.

CSS github.com

A ridiculously small responsive CSS framework

lit is 395 bytes small. For reference, here’s 395 bytes of Lorem Ipsum text:

Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit. Vestibulum at gravida nibh. Aenean vulputate ante quam. In imperdiet fermentum risus, vel varius dui vehicula non. Nunc gravida faucibus erat, vitae accumsan eros accumsan eget. Nam at fringilla turpis. Aenean mollis diam leo, quis eleifend ex efficitur sit amet. Sed porttitor quis mauris eu varius. Sed viverra sagittis dapibus blandit.

Andrey Sitnik Evil Martians

PostCSS 8.0 is coming. Here’s what it brings

Andrey Sitnik:

PostCSS, the framework for processing CSS with JavaScript that I started building while working at Evil Martians, has been around since 2013. With 100+ million downloads a month, it quietly tops the charts of most popular front-end tools. It is harder to find front-end code that does not rely on it in one way or another, many thanks to the ecosystem of plugins that the community has been building for years.

Support the project on Open Collective and click through to read what’s in store for the first major release in over two years.

Eric Meyer meyerweb.com

It’s time to get static

Eric Meyer says…

If you are in charge of a web site that provides even slightly important information, or important services, it’s time to get static.

…too many sites are already crashing because their CMSes can’t keep up with the traffic surges. And too many sites are using dynamic frameworks that drain mobile batteries and shut out people with older browsers. That’s annoying and counter-productive in the best of times, but right now, it’s unacceptable.

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