GitHub Icon

GitHub

GitHub is where millions of developers gather every day to collaborate on open source software.
85 Stories
All Topics

The Changelog The Changelog #395

Leading GitHub to a $7.5 billion acquisition

Jason Warner (CTO at GitHub) joined the show to talk with us about the backstory of how he helped to lead GitHub to a $7.5 billion acquisition by Microsoft. Specifically how they trusted their gut not just the data, and how they understood the value they were bringing to market. We also talk about Jason’s focus on “horizon 3” for GitHub, and his thoughts on remote work and how they’re leading GitHub engineering today.

Atom discuss.atom.io

Is GitHub Codespaces a death knell for the Atom Editor?

May 7th, 2020: A discussion appears on Atom’s forum…

I use Atom for a few years now and was worried back then about the acquisition of Github from Microsoft. And now I read about Github Codespaces, which is powered by Visual Studio Code.

I’m a little concerned about this. Do you still support Atom? And do you support Atom in the future? If there are other opportunities of embedding a Editor or innovating would you also choose VS Code over Atom?

What is the future of Atom? Will you slowly move to VS Code and Atom will be on the support line?

All good questions. There’s been no official (or unofficial, that I’ve seen) response from GitHub just yet.

We’ve been following Atom for years now. Many great developers have put their efforts into the editor. But it’s hard to withstand the gravitational pull of VS Code. Even more so now that Microsoft owns GitHub? 🤔

InfoQ Icon InfoQ

Codespaces and Discussions headline GitHub Satellite 2020

InfoQ has a nice rundown of all that GitHub announced at Satellite this week. On Codespaces:

Codespaces gives you a fully-featured, cloud-hosted dev environment that spins up in seconds, directly within GitHub, so you can start contributing to a project right away.

At the heart of Codespaces lies Visual Studio Code running in your browser, so you get code completion, extensions, code navigation, and the rest of Visual Studio Code features you are used to.

On Discussions:

GitHub Discussions appear very similar to Issues and Pull Requests on the outside, but they aim to go beyond the linear structure of the latter by supporting a threaded questions and answers format. According to GitHub, this should make it easier to organize an otherwise unstructured conversation and build a persistent knowledge base.

I’m personally not too excited about either of these features. I think Codespaces could be a big deal for casual contributions, but those are the lowest form of contribution. Discussions seems like a direct shot at StackOverflow, which makes good business sense, but I wonder if it will get mired in the Issues/Pull Requests/Wikis mucky muck.

Arthur Busser padok.fr

Getting started with GitHub Actions

In this post Arthur covers the core concepts, the question “Should you use GitHub Actions?”, and a step-by-step tutorial to build a functional CI/CD pipeline using GitHub Actions.

If you are already using GitHub to host your project’s source code, getting started with GitHub Actions is effortless. The fact that it integrates fully with the entire GitHub ecosystem means your team can double down on using the platform as a significant part of your software development process.

Overall, my opinion is that GitHub Actions is worth a try. Whether this is the automation system best suited for your team depends on your specific needs.

GitHub Blog Icon GitHub Blog

GitHub is acquiring npm

This.. is a bit of a bombshell:

The work of the npm team over the last 10 years, and the contributions of hundreds of thousands of open source developers and maintainers, have made npm home to over 1.3 million packages with 75 billion downloads a month. Together, they’ve helped JavaScript become the largest developer ecosystem in the world. We at GitHub are honored to be part of the next chapter of npm’s story and to help npm continue to scale to meet the needs of the fast-growing JavaScript community.

Software is eating the world. Meanwhile, Microsoft is eating the software world… one acquisition at a time.

The New Stack Icon The New Stack

Why I moved my personal projects to GitLab

To answer the question in the headline:

  1. I find the GitLab UI to be cleaner in general and easier to find my way around. However, this is purely a matter of taste and probably not a strong reason to move.
  2. I also like how GitLab is open source. I am far from an open source zealot, but I do prefer to write and use open source software. While Github is full of Open Source projects, Github itself is proprietary. In contrast, Gitlab has a well-supported open source version.
  3. The project import feature worked very well, so it was trivially easy to move the code, branches and issues over.

The author goes on to describe why GitLab’s project management workflow works well for him.

Jonathan Carter github.com

GistPad for VS Code 📘

GistPad is a Visual Studio Code extension that allows you to manage GitHub Gists entirely within the editor. You can open, create, delete, fork, star and clone gists, and then seamlessly begin editing files as if they were local.

The big idea here is to use gists to seamlessly create your “very own developer library”. The interactive playgrounds is pretty cool, too.

GistPad for VS Code 📘

GitHub github.com

The official GitHub CLI is now in beta

gh brings many of GitHub’s concepts to the terminal. You know, things like pull requests and issues. The tool is still under heavy development and they’re looking for feedback. If you’re an early adopter, this is the perfect time to get involved and let your voice be heard. Oh, and if you’ve been using hub for years already, here’s how the new shiny compares:

gh is a new project for us to explore what an official GitHub CLI tool can look like with a fundamentally different design. While both tools bring GitHub to the terminal, hub behaves as a proxy to git and gh is a standalone tool.

The official GitHub CLI is now in beta

The Changelog The Changelog #370

The making of GitHub Sponsors

Devon Zuegel is an Open Source Product Manager at GitHub. She’s also one of the key people responsible for making GitHub Sponsors a thing. We talk with Devon about how she came to GitHub to develop GitHub Sponsors, the months of research she did to learn how to best solve the sustainability problem of open source, why GitHub is now addressing this issue, the various ways and models of addressing maintainers’ financial needs, and Devon also shared what’s in store for the future of GitHub Sponsors.

Eileen Uchitelle github.blog

Running GitHub on Rails 6.0

Eileen Uchitelle shared the backstory of how they have GitHub running on Rails 6.0 just 1.5 weeks after its final release. 👏

As soon as we finished the Rails 5.2 upgrade last year, we started upgrading our application to Rails 6.0. Instead of waiting for the final release, we’d upgrade every week by pulling in the latest changes from Rails master and run all of our tests against that new version. This allowed us to find regressions quickly and early—often finding regressions in Rails master just hours after they were introduced. Upgrading weekly made it easy to find where these regressions were introduced since we were bisecting Rails with only a week’s worth of commits instead of more than a year of commits.

npm blog.npmjs.org

npm token scanning extending to GitHub

The npm team is collaborating with GitHub on a new service that will automatically check for tokens that might have been accidentally pushed up to a repository and then automatically revoke them if they are valid. This will help to quickly mitigate attack vectors that might arise from the accidental oversharing of credentials for projects. From the post:

Whenever you commit or push a change to GitHub in a public repository and an npm token is found in the change, it is sent to npm for validation. If it’s valid, we will revoke it and notify the maintainer of this action via email.

Bloomberg Icon Bloomberg

Microsoft wins over skeptics. Wins back developers.

Like many out there, I was a skeptic of Microsoft’s acquisition of GitHub. To be honest, in some ways I still am. We’ve been tracking this topic very closely over the last several years. What’s particularly interesting to me is this story — Scott Guthrie wrote a proposal in 2014 to acquire GitHub and filed it away in a drawer.

In 2014, Microsoft Corp. cloud chief Scott Guthrie wrote up a proposal to acquire GitHub Inc. Then he filed the plan away in a drawer. Every once in a while he’d take the plan out and look at it, and then return it to the cabinet. Guthrie felt Microsoft just wasn’t ready to acquire the popular open-source company…

Fast forward 5 years…GitHub has been acquired and Nat Friedman (CEO of GitHub) says “GitHub has to be neutral and GitHub has to be independent. Developers want choice. GitHub can’t have any favoritism.”

With that kind of intention and posture, my skepticism is eroding.

Nadia Eghbal nadiaeghbal.com

The Twitch argument for GitHub Sponsors

Nadia Eghbal thinks GitHub Sponsors might be more like Twitch than it is like Patreon.

Twitch streamers and, similarly I think, GitHub open source developers, benefit from an additional set of motivations, which is, “I want to watch and learn from you”. A graphic artist or a blogger who’s funded on Patreon doesn’t quite have that same relationship to their audience. In those cases, I think their output – the artifacts they create – takes center stage.

She also thinks this dynamic might indicate that individual sponsorships will succeed despite enterprises being “where the money’s at”. I don’t know how this all will play out, but I do know it’ll be interesting!

0:00 / 0:00