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Maxime Vaillancourt maximevaillancourt.com

Automatically labeling GitHub notification emails with Gmail filters

Maintaining a GitHub project with other people creates “many email notifications about various things.” But they don’t all hold the same importance. Maxime Vaillancourt shows us how to use Gmail filters and labels to better manage all the emails coming from GitHub issues, etc.

I receive many email notifications about various things that happen on there: direct requests to review a particular piece of code, feedback on pull requests I’ve opened, pull requests merged by their authors, people directly mentioning our username in a comment, issues closed by their authors, etc. I receive hundreds of emails every single week.

…using Gmail filters, we can automatically add labels to GitHub notification emails based on their content. This solution takes less than 10 minutes to implement, and the long-term return on investment is quite appreciable.

Automatically labeling GitHub notification emails with Gmail filters

Ezekiel Sikelianos github.blog

How we open sourced docs.github.com

GitHub open sourced this long-lived private project. Learn about the why and how in this post…

Last week we open sourced all of GitHub’s product documentation, along with the Node.js web application that powers it. Check out our new public repository at github.com/github/docs.

This post tells the story of why we wanted to open source the docs, what tools we built and open sourced along the way, and how we worked to make the project welcoming to external contributors.

Romain Barissat github.com

A GitHub Action to maintain mono-to-many repos

Romain Barissat:

I made this to be able to open-source parts of our monorepo while keeping the rest private.

The result is a tool that allows you to have one monorepo that is the source of truth for as many other repos as you want. It could also be used to create “workspace” repos if you onboard a freelance and you don’t want to give him access to your whole mono-repo.

We are using nx as a monorepo tool, here is an example of it using the Copybara Action

Based on Google’s Copybara project.

GitHub github.blog

The GitHub CLI goes 1.0

If you haven’t given the new gh a look since they announced the beta earlier this year, a lot has changed:

Since we released the beta, users have created over 250,000 pull requests, performed over 350,000 merges, and created over 20,000 issues with GitHub CLI.

It’s available for all major operating systems and if your development workflow goes through GitHub you will undoubtedly save some time and typing by adopting it.

The Changelog The Changelog #411

Inside GitHub's Arctic Code Vault

Earlier this year on February 2nd, 2020 Jon Evans and his team of archivists took a snapshot of all active public repositories on GitHub and sent it to a decommissioned coal mine in the Svalbard archipelago where it will be stored for the next 1,000 years.

On this episode, Jon chats with Jerod all about the GitHub Archive Program and how they’re preserving open source software for future generations.

GitHub Blog Icon GitHub Blog

"Set the default branch name" feature has landed on GitHub

Following Git 2.28’s highly sought after ability to configure init.defaultBranch comes GitHub’s support at the platform level.

You can now set the default branch name for newly-created repositories under your username. This setting does not impact any of your existing repositories. Existing repositories will continue to have the same default branch they have now.

But even if you do nothing…

On October 1, 2020, if you haven’t changed the default branch for new repositories for your user, organization, or enterprise, it will automatically change from master to main.

GitHub github.com

GitHub's public roadmap

Two days ago on this repo appeared on the top starred repositories first timers list on Changelog Nightly

In this repository, you can find the official GitHub public product roadmap. Our product roadmap is where you can learn about what features we’re working on, what stage they’re in, and when we expect to bring them to you.

The roadmap repository is for communicating GitHub’s roadmap. Existing issues are currently read-only, and we are locking conversations, as we get started. Interaction limits are also in place to ensure issues originate from GitHub. We’re planning to iterate on the format of the roadmap itself, and we see potential to engage more in discussions about the future of GitHub products and features.

Taylor Blau GitHub Blog

Git 2.28 brings `init.defaultBranch`

Leading off the updates for Git 2.28 is the highly sought after ability to configure init.defaultBranch so folks can move from master to main as their default branch name.

From Taylor Blau on the GitHub blog:

When you initialize a new Git repository from scratch with git init, Git has always created an initial first branch with the name master. In Git 2.28, a new configuration option, init.defaultBranch is being introduced to replace the hard-coded term. (For more background on this change, this statement from the Software Freedom Conservancy is an excellent place to look).

Starting in Git 2.28, git init will instead look to the value of init.defaultBranch when creating the first branch in a new repository. If that value is unset, init.defaultBranch defaults to master

Also check out github/renaming to learn more about the complementary changes GitHub is making. GitLab and Bitbucket are making similar changes.

Git 2.28 brings `init.defaultBranch`

Jerod Santo YouTube

Jonathan Clem from the GitHub Actions team joins me for a jam session

I thought it’d be cool to get mix test and mix format running on pushes to the changelog.com repo, so I gave GitHub Actions the old college try. After (not too much) futzing around on my own, I figured I’d have more success by getting an expert to help out. Good call be me! 😆

In this ~1 hour jam session, we go from zero to a successful Actions workflow. I learned a lot along the way, and you might too by joining us on the journey. Thanks, Jonathan!

Caleb Porzio changelog.com/posts

I just hit $100,000/yr on GitHub Sponsors 🎉

I am now making more money than I’ve ever made while developing open-source software for a community that I adore. Pinch me, I’m dreaming.

Was it luck? there’s certainly been a lot of that.

Was it fate? Let’s leave religion out of this mmkay?…

Was it that the software I built was so incredibly compelling that it forced 535 people to give me at least $14/mo. to keep working on it? …I wish.

It’s more than that though. There were some key things I did along the way to get here. Let me tell you all about them.

Jared Palmer jaredpalmer.com

GitHub isn't fun anymore

Jared Palmer:

At first I thought it was just me getting older and more experienced. But after several conversations about it with colleagues and other open source maintainers, I’m not the only one who feels this way.

After a lot of reflection, I believe the turning point was when they changed how the ranking system on the Trending page worked.

I don’t know if I ever considered GitHub fun, but I agree the trending section has lost value over the years. You know what is fun, though? Getting the day’s hottest new & trending repos delivered directly to your inbox. That’s what. 😉

Founders Talk Founders Talk #70

Leading GitLab to $100M ARR

Sid Sijbrandij is the Co-founder and CEO of GitLab — an all-remote company and complete DevOps platform. As a company, they have their eyes set on taking the company public to IPO and they’re very outspoken about their culture, open handbook, and how they work as an all-remote company. We talk through where Sid came from, the early days of GitLab, why IPO vs a private sale (like GitHub), what it means to put “family and friends first, work second,” how we should view work, and his biggest fear — the company failing.

The Changelog The Changelog #395

Leading GitHub to a $7.5 billion acquisition

Jason Warner (CTO at GitHub) joined the show to talk with us about the backstory of how he helped to lead GitHub to a $7.5 billion acquisition by Microsoft. Specifically how they trusted their gut not just the data, and how they understood the value they were bringing to market. We also talk about Jason’s focus on “horizon 3” for GitHub, and his thoughts on remote work and how they’re leading GitHub engineering today.

Atom discuss.atom.io

Is GitHub Codespaces a death knell for the Atom Editor?

May 7th, 2020: A discussion appears on Atom’s forum…

I use Atom for a few years now and was worried back then about the acquisition of Github from Microsoft. And now I read about Github Codespaces, which is powered by Visual Studio Code.

I’m a little concerned about this. Do you still support Atom? And do you support Atom in the future? If there are other opportunities of embedding a Editor or innovating would you also choose VS Code over Atom?

What is the future of Atom? Will you slowly move to VS Code and Atom will be on the support line?

All good questions. There’s been no official (or unofficial, that I’ve seen) response from GitHub just yet.

We’ve been following Atom for years now. Many great developers have put their efforts into the editor. But it’s hard to withstand the gravitational pull of VS Code. Even more so now that Microsoft owns GitHub? 🤔

InfoQ Icon InfoQ

Codespaces and Discussions headline GitHub Satellite 2020

InfoQ has a nice rundown of all that GitHub announced at Satellite this week. On Codespaces:

Codespaces gives you a fully-featured, cloud-hosted dev environment that spins up in seconds, directly within GitHub, so you can start contributing to a project right away.

At the heart of Codespaces lies Visual Studio Code running in your browser, so you get code completion, extensions, code navigation, and the rest of Visual Studio Code features you are used to.

On Discussions:

GitHub Discussions appear very similar to Issues and Pull Requests on the outside, but they aim to go beyond the linear structure of the latter by supporting a threaded questions and answers format. According to GitHub, this should make it easier to organize an otherwise unstructured conversation and build a persistent knowledge base.

I’m personally not too excited about either of these features. I think Codespaces could be a big deal for casual contributions, but those are the lowest form of contribution. Discussions seems like a direct shot at StackOverflow, which makes good business sense, but I wonder if it will get mired in the Issues/Pull Requests/Wikis mucky muck.

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