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iOS

iOS is the operating system for Apple's mobile products.
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How Apple plans to address the systemic issue that made iOS 13 so buggy

iOS 13’s rollout was soooo buggy. Most notably: backgrounded apps were routinely being killed for no reason. What was to blame? …Apple top executives Craig Federighi and Stacey Lysik identified iOS daily builds’ instability as the main culprit for iOS 13 bugs. In short, Apple developers were pushing too many unfinished or buggy features to the daily builds. Since new features were active by default, independently of their maturity level, testers had a hard time to actually use their devices, which caused Apple’s buggy releases. Here’s how they plan to address the problem: Federighi suggested leaving all new features disabled by default, so testers can ensure no regressions make it into the latest build and avoid being impaired by new bugs. New features shall be enabled on-demand by testers using a new internal Flags menu, making it possible to test each new feature in isolation. How did it take Apple to the end of 2019 before they discovered feature flags? I hope it helps 🤞

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Erik Kennedy learnui.design

Designing for iOS and Android

From Erik Kennedy who shared some tactical design advice for developers — this awesome visual guide covers the primary differences between designing for iOS and Android, including navigation, UI controls, typography, app icons, and more. If you’re designing both an iOS and an Android (Material Design) version of an app, this guide is your new best friend 😎. We’re going to cover the most relevant differences between iOS and Android for UX/UI designers. If you’ve created an app on one platform, this is most of what you need to know to “translate” it for the other platform.

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Mattt Thompson nshipster.com

Flight School - essential topics in iOS and macOS development

Today, I’m excited to announce updates to our guides to Swift Codable and Numbers, as well as a brand new Guide to Swift Strings. Everything is up-to-date with the latest from Swift 5 and Xcode 10.2, and now — for the first time — available in print! If you dig NSHipster, you’ll love Flight School. Amazing cover design! I love it when the cover of a book makes you want to read it.

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Federico Viticci MacStories

This iOS shortcut proves you can do awesome programming with Shortcuts

Federico Viticci on MacStories didn’t understand why Apple Music doesn’t offer a “Year in Review” feature, so he built his own: But Apple doesn’t seem interested in adding this feature to Apple Music, so I decided to build my own using Shortcuts. The result is the most complex shortcut I’ve ever created comprising over 540 actions. I just tried out the shortcut last night, and it’s incredible. But as Federico himself points out, doing something this complex pushes the boundaries of Shortcuts and iOS: Apple Music Wrapped pushes the limits of what is possible to achieve with the ‘Find Music Where…’ and ‘Open URLs’ actions of the Shortcuts app. In the past few weeks, I (and other testers) have run into limitations and inconsistencies worth pointing out both for MacStories readers and Shortcuts engineers at Apple. It’s nothing short of a programmatic feat, and if you use Apple Music, I recommend you give it a shot.

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Mattt Thompson nshipster.com

Bundles and packages

Mattt over at NSHipster explains two important abstractions on Apple platforms: bundles and packages. Despite being distinct concepts, the terms “bundle” and “package” are frequently used interchangeably. Part of this is undoubtedly due to their similar names, but perhaps the main source of confusion is that many bundles just so happen to be packages (and vice versa). So before we go any further, let’s define our terminology: …

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Swift github.com

Mast – a beautiful Mastodon app for iOS

Mobile apps were one of the big discussion points when we talked Mastodon on episode #315 of The Changelog. Here’s one thing Eugen had to say about the subject: Oh, yeah, for some reason I get a lot of questions like “Why isn’t Mastodon on the app store?” and it’s really weird, because there are like a million apps for Mastodon on every app store… They’re just not called Mastodon, because they are developed by third-party developers. Mastodon has a principle - API first, and… Yeah, that’s essentially it - API first. [laughter] Add Mast to the ever-growing list of third-party developers making iOS apps for Mastodon.

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iOS github.com

A book on getting to the #1 spot in the App Store

If this book intrigues you (like it does me), start nowhere else but the “How to Read This Book”: A successful iOS game makes $4,000 annually (this goes for any app frankly). A successful Android game makes one seventh of that (one third at best). You are not a large multi-million dollar company (at least I don’t think you are given that you’re reading this book). So you don’t have the customer acquisition/marketing budget to beat this $4,000 annual average. Period. Brutal. What’s a dev to do, then? Make lots of niche, high quality games.

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Lyndsey github.com

🎯 The best fastlane plugin to understand and tame misbehaving iOS tests

Lyndsey Ferguson: Unit testing and the tests themselves are written by humans. Humans are prone to error. Unit tests and the testing infrastructure can be imperfect. The test_center plugin includes tools that remove (or alleviate) the effects of an imperfect test infrastructure. (fastlane is a popular way to automate building/releasing iOS and Android apps.)

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Apple thedevelopersunion.org

The Developers Union - a ‘non-union union’ advocating for sustainability in the App Store

Want developers of great software to be able to make a living doing it? Want free trials in the App Store? Join The Developers Union! Dear Apple, We believe that people who create great software should be able to make a living doing it. So we created The Developers Union to advocate for sustainability in the App Store. Today, we are asking Apple to publicly commit — by the tenth anniversary of the App Store this July — to allowing free trials for all apps in the App Stores before July 2019. After that, we’ll start advocating for a more reasonable revenue cut and other community-driven, developer-friendly changes.

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iOS github.com

Windows 95 style UI components for iOS 😱

Feeling nostalgic for Windows 95? Blake Tsuzaki was: This is a little exploration into applying ’90s-era design & principles into a modern platform with some primitive components. The assets and design metrics were (for the most part) taken from an actual installation of Windows 95. You may be wondering why all the effort? You’ll find answers to that question and more in the README.

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iOS fastcodesign.com

3D face tracking UI experiment with iPhone X

Peder Norrby created TheParallaxView, a UI experiment for his iPhone X, that gives it a trompe-l’oeil effect. Trompe-l’oeil is an age-old trick used by painters to create the illusion of 3D depth on a 2D plane. On the iPhone X, it’s downright mesmerizing. The touchscreen itself seems to melt away as the phone transforms into a portal to an infinite abyss. Angle the phone, or your own head, and you can even peek inside, as if you’re looking through a peephole into another room, or inspecting a can of Pringles for the last few crumbs. The source is on GitHub — plus check out this blog post and this Twitter thread for more of the backstory.

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iOS motherboard.vice.com

Someone published the source code to iBoot (a critical piece of iOS) on GitHub

This is being called “the biggest leak in history”, which is probably not true (remember when Gizmodo got its grubby paws on the iPhone 4?). But it’s likely the biggest leak in Apple software history. Motherboard says it… could pave the way for hackers and security researchers to find vulnerabilities in iOS and make iPhone jailbreaks easier to achieve. That’s plausible. iBoot is responsible for ensuring a trusted boot of the O/S. The specific version posted was from iOS 9, but this portion of code probably doesn’t get updated as often as the Music app, so it’s likely still relevant. Apple promptly posted a DMCA takedown request, and the source code is no longer publicly available. But we developers know all to well that once source code is made public, there’s no taking it private again.

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Smashing Magazine Icon Smashing Magazine

Making a mobile app with facial recognition features

This article isn’t a how-to, per se. It’s more like a research report written after attempting to build such an app for the first time. There’s nothing wrong with that, though, and this write-up is super useful if you’re about to tackle a similar problem space. Open source libraries are tried, facial recognition services are evaluated, and their takeaways are solid, if not a bit disappointing. As you can see, the really simple idea of using facial recognition functionality was not that simple to implement. The entire piece is worth a read.

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iOS changelog.com/posts

Firefox is coming to iOS

Mozilla recently announced that they're finally bringing Firefox to iOS. They'll have to use iOS's built-in rendering engine like everybody else, which begs the question: What makes this Firefox? Time will tell whether they're too late to the game or not. In the meantime, the source code is freely available (and under heavy development). From the README: This is a work in progress on some early ideas. Don't get too attached to this code. Tomorrow everything will be different. Could be a fun project to track, especially if you're interested in Swift.

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iOS changelog.com/posts

Meet Overshare: A soup-to-nuts sharing library for iOS

Overshare looks like a great solution to the common need of iOS apps to share their content with 3rd parties. It boasts: Beautiful share sheets with pixel-perfect, full-color icons in a simple layout. Built-in integration with iOS Twitter and Facebook accounts. Built-in integration with popular third-party services like App.net, Instapaper, and more. And much more.

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iOS changelog.com/posts

Prototype your iOS apps with Quartz Composer and qc-mobile

Apple’s Quartz Composer has enjoyed renewed enthusiasm as a prototyping tool after recent news and video tutorials on how Facebook prototyped Home using the tool. Joris Kluivers takes QC-based prototyping for iOS one step further with qc-mobile, which makes it possible to load, display, and interact with .qtz files on iOS. It’s still early days for the project (as Joris explains in his introductory blog post), but it is functional enough to render Jay Thrash’s iMessage recreation as seen in the demo video below. Now is a great time to get involved and make significant contributions to the project! qc-mobile is MIT licensed and hosted on GitHub.

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iOS changelog.com/posts

An implementation of Facebook's ChatHeads on iOS

If you’re a fan of Facebook 6.0 with Chat Heads you’re gonna love this. This project is an attempt to re-implement this feature and to figure out how the animations are done. I don't support this project in a way to completely implement all features of ChatHeads. It should only illustrate how parts of ChatHeads are done. Yours truly even has a commit. Sure, it’s just a spelling change, but that’s all it takes. Check out the source on GitHub. ht/ @Soffes

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iOS changelog.com/posts

Helios: a server side for your iOS app

Today, the always-impressive Mattt released a new project: Helios. Helios is an open-source framework that provides essential backend services for iOS apps, from data synchronization and user accounts to push notifications, in-app purchases, and passbook integration. It allows developers to get a client-server app up-and-running in just a few minutes, and seamlessly incorporate functionality as necessary. Getting started is easy: $ gem install helios $ helios new myapp $ cd myapp; helios server $ open http://localhost:5000/admin Helios is broken down into useful components, too. If you check out the .gemspec, you’ll notice a few other gems that would be useful for anyone trying to build a backend service. There’s a lot of startups that do “Backend as a Service,” such as Parse, so it’s nice to see an OSS competitor pop up.

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