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JavaScript

JavaScript is an object-oriented programming language used alongside HTML and CSS to give functionality to web pages.
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JavaScript github.com

A Minecraft clone built entirely with JS

Having to open an additional app to play a game is sometimes too tiring. Therefore, I thought it’d be interesting to somehow implement Minecraft with javascript, essentially bringing the whole Minecraft game into the web. This not only takes away the tedious process of installing the game, it also brings the entire game to players within a couple clicks. Words cannot describe how much I adore the thought that building this extremely ambitious piece of software was a better alternative to the tedious process of installing the game. 😆

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Fred K. Schott DEV.to

A future without Webpack

We continue to use bundlers even though ES Modules (the new JavaScript module system) runs natively on the web. Why? Over the last several years, JavaScript bundling has morphed from a production-only optimization into a required build step for most web applications. Whether you love this or hate it, it’s hard to deny that bundlers have added a ton of new complexity to web development – a field of development that has always taken pride in its view-source, easy-to-get-started ethos. Related ~> JS Party #69

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JS Party JS Party #87

Websites should work without JS. Yep? Nope?

We’re trying a brand new segment called YepNope, wherein your intrepid panelists engage in a lively debate around a premise. In this debate, Feross and KBall argue that websites should work without requiring JS and Divya and Chris say, “Nah!” Please let us know if you like this style episode! We had fun recording it, but that doesn’t matter much if y’all don’t enjoy listening to it.

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The Changelog The Changelog #355

Federating JavaScript's language commons with Entropic

We’re joined by C J Silverio, aka ceejbot on Twitter, aka 2nd hire and former CTO at npm Inc. We talk with Ceej about her recent JS Conf EU talk titled “The Economies of Open Source” where she laid our her concerns with the JavaScript language commons being owned by venture capitalists. Currently the JavaScript language commons is controlled by the npm registery, and as you may know, npm is a VC backed for profit start up. Of course we also talk with Ceej about the bomb she dropped, Entropic, at the end of that talk — a federated package registry for JavaScript C J hopes will unseat npm and free the JavaScript language commons.

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JavaScript itnext.io

‘No way to prevent this’, says only development community where this regularly happens

A wonderfully snarky take on the ongoing challenges with dependency management in JavaScript. PURESCRIPT, NPM — In the hours following another package disaster on npm in which a lone developer killed more than dozens of CI builds and caused serious warnings in thousands of others, developers of the only community where this kind of disaster routinely occurs reportedly concluded Monday that there was no way to prevent the disaster from taking place.

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Wassim Chegham xlayers.dev

Preview and convert Sketch design files into any framework and library

xLayers is a web app which aims to bridge the gap between designers and developers. Its mission is to allow both the design and development worlds to collaborate and iterate fast. Upload your Sketch file and you will get the code generated for your favorite framework of choice (React, Vue, Angular, LitHtml, Stencil and even Xamarin Forms…and more to come).

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JS Party JS Party #85

Building PizzaQL at the age of 16

Jerod, Mikeal, and Feross welcome Antoni Kepinski to the show to discuss his open source pizza ordering management web app. We talk about learning programming at a young age, how overwhelming web development can be these days, how Antoni decided which technologies to use, and more. This is a super fun conversation with many insights and takeaways for developers at every stage of their career.

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Dan Abramov overreacted.io

Algebraic effects for the rest of us

Like so many of Dan Abramov’s posts, this blew my mind. He is incredible at breaking down complicated concepts and making them understandable, as well as showing the reasons behind the concepts. Should you read this post? I’d say yes, but Dan would say: If you’re the kind of person who likes to learn about programming ideas several years before they hit the mainstream, it might be a good time to get curious about algebraic effects. Don’t feel like you have to though. It is a bit like thinking about async / await in 1999.

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Brad Frost bradfrost.com

Choosing tools

You’re working on a home improvement project. You can choose max. 5 tools. Which ones do you pick? Sort of depends on what the home improvement project is, yeah? If the gig is repairing the toilet tank gasket, I’m likely not going to need my circular saw. But what if I really love my circular saw? I agree 110% with what author Brad Frost is saying here - we have a tendency in our world to get caught up in which tools we like and try to apply them to every situation and rarely ask what the right tools are for any particular job.

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Slack Engineering Icon Slack Engineering

When a rewrite isn’t: rebuilding Slack on the desktop

The Ship of Theseus is a thought experiment that considers whether an object that has had each of its pieces replaced one-by-one over time is still the same object when all is said and done. If every piece of wood in a ship has been replaced, is it the same ship? If every piece of JavaScript in an app has been replaced, is it the same app? We sure hoped so, because this seemed like the best course of action. Fascinating look behind the scenes at both the process of rewriting a massively used application and the particular architectural choices made along the way. The approach used was at once incremental and all-encompassing, rewriting a piece at a time into a gradually growing “modern” section of the application that utilized React and Redux. And the results? 50% reduction of memory use and 33% improvement in load time… not too shabby.

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Peter Lu github.com

XSM – an "extraordinarily simple" state management solution

[XSM] consists of a global store and the machinary to re-render the component when the state is updated. The store is just a JavaScript object with key and value pairs. By binding the instance reference, this, to the store, each component can react to the changes of the store whether it is re-render or unmount. It is really this simple, no need to use HOC, provider, reducer, decorator, observer, action, dispatcher, etc. Hence, all the three most popular framewokrs work the same way in XSM and that’s why we can keep the code size very small and support the three frameworks without framework specific modules. Works out of the box with Angular, React, and Vue.

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Google steinhq.com

Use Google Sheets as your no-setup database

This looks like a great option for proofs of concept or when you want to take an idea to market as fast as possible. It’s also probably empowering to non-developers on the team since so many people can slice-n-dice spreadsheets better than SQL databases. You can self-host the open source version or pay for the hosted offering. I’d love to see a comparison between this and Airtable.

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Smashing Magazine Icon Smashing Magazine

Improve your JavaScript knowledge by reading source code

One of the most amazing things about Open Source is how much it enables you to learn from the best. Just open up the source for your favorite library or framework and you can start learning from the best in the business. But that can feel intimidating. This article breaks down some approaches you can use to make it easier. As author Carl Mungazi says: Reading source code is difficult at first but as with anything, it becomes easier with time. The goal is not to understand everything but to come away with a different perspective and new knowledge. The key is to be deliberate about the entire process and intensely curious about everything.

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