Learn Icon

Learn

Learning to code, leveling up, building your skills. Expand your résumé and pursue a fulfilling developer career.
68 Stories
All Topics

Y Combinator Icon Y Combinator

Now you can listen to Startup Playbook by Sam Altman (for free)

The book is free in Kindle format on Amazon AND you can listen for free on the web! We spend a lot of time advising startups. Though one-on-one advice will always be crucial, we thought it might help us scale Y Combinator if we could distill the most generalizable parts of this advice into a sort of playbook we could give YC and YC Fellowship companies. Then we thought we should just give it to everyone. This is meant for people new to the world of startups. Most of this will not be new to people who have read a lot of what YC partners have written—the goal is to get it into one place.

read more

Max Stoiber mxstbr.com

Regrets and lessons learned building Spectrum

Max Stoiber shares his regrets and lessons learned from tech choices made when building Spectrum. Yes, this is the same Spectrum recently acquired by GitHub. With the benefit of hindsight, here are the technology choices I regret and the lessons I have learned. … Changing these decisions would not have made Spectrum a better product by itself. Yet, it would have saved us time and allowed us to spend more time experimenting.

read more

Virginia Balseiro freeCodeCamp

How I finished the entire freeCodeCamp curriculum in 9 months while working full time

Virginia Balseiro shared her story and experience of completing the freeCodeCamp curriculum last year. It wasn’t easy, I won’t lie. It helped that most of my friends and acquaintances don’t live near me, and I live in a small town that doesn’t offer a lot of entertainment opportunities. …I couldn’t just quit my job and study full time, since I needed to pay the bills, so I had to get really good at 3 things: Time management Discipline Organization Not only does Virginia share her experience and strategy, but also other supplemental resources she used on her freeCodeCamp journey.

read more

Siddhant Goel devtomanager.com

Interviews with experienced software developers on moving to management

Siddhant Goel: “Developer to Manager” is a platform that helps younger developers during one of the trickiest phases of their careers - their move to management. We host a collection of interviews with experienced software developers on how they successfully transitioned into a more managerial role. The interviews range from small startups to big companies, and talk about the main takeaways, best practices, things to avoid, and a lot more.

read more

Eduards Sizovs sizovs.net

Stop learning frameworks. Learn fundamentals.

Eduards Sizovs shares advice that changed his life, how that advice helped him to remove all framework books from his bookshelf and in the process shrank his “guilt pile” of books to read from 50 to 0! Time is the most precious resource we have. Time is limited, nonrenewable and you cannot buy more of it. Technology, like fashion, is changing at the speed of light. To catch up, we need to run very fast. This race has no winners because it has no end. Fast forward to the advice part and Eduards shares this from a conversation between with his mentor… Mentor: “Technologies come and go, but it has a lot in common. Set priorities right. Invest 80% of your learning time in fundamentals. Leave 20% for frameworks, libraries and tools.”

read more

Mattt Thompson nshipster.com

Bundles and packages

Mattt over at NSHipster explains two important abstractions on Apple platforms: bundles and packages. Despite being distinct concepts, the terms “bundle” and “package” are frequently used interchangeably. Part of this is undoubtedly due to their similar names, but perhaps the main source of confusion is that many bundles just so happen to be packages (and vice versa). So before we go any further, let’s define our terminology: …

read more

Henrik Warne henrikwarne.com

Lessons learned while being a developer on call (for 10 years)

Being on call isn’t that bad if you find ways to learn from it and make it worth your time and effort. Henrik covers to “why’s”, alarms and alerting systems, and even compensation and scheduling. Henrik writes: For most of the past ten years, I have been on organized on call rotations for the systems I have been developing. I think being on call is a logical way of taking responsibility for your work. You also learn a lot from it. However, it is stressful and an inconvenience, so you should get paid for it.

read more

Quincy Larson freeCodeCamp

freeCodeCamp – the first BILLION minutes

Quincy Larson: People have now spent more than 1 billion minutes using freeCodeCamp. That’s the equivalent of nearly 2,000 years. To put it another way — if freeCodeCamp usage was a person, it would be old enough to have broken bread with Jesus himself. Congrats to everyone who’s helped freeCodeCamp reach this milestone! Quite an accomplishment, and just the beginning for the tiny nonprofit that’s teaching the world to code. Quincy shares a bunch of numbers in this post, including traffic comparisons between freecodecamp.org and funded startups.

read more

Budi Tanrim yellowstroke.com

Things I learned while working at Shopify

Budi Tanrim recently left his “dream job” at Shopify, but learned some extremely important career/life lessons along the way. I put this in the “must read” category. A lot of people asked me, “Budi, are you crazy? Why did you leave Shopify?” I often think about this, leaving behind a fantastic company, an excellent mentor, and free lunch seems like a crazy move for me, too. It still is. But…

read more

JavaScript ably.io

WebSockets – a conceptual deep-dive

This is a nice, deep primer on WebSockets. It includes some web history, describes WebSockets in detail, and catalogs available libraries you can use to get started with them. Here’s the intro to the topic: In a nutshell, WebSockets are a thin transport layer built on top of a device’s TCP/IP stack. The intent is to provide what is essentially an as-close-to-raw-as-possible TCP communication layer to web application developers while adding a few abstractions to eliminate certain friction that would otherwise exist concerting the way the web works.

read more

Michael Snoyman snoyman.com

A crash course for Rust

Michael Snoyman introduces his upcoming blog series. If this intro is any indicator, Michael’s Rust crash course will be an excellent resource. Here’s a taste, in which he begins to answer the question, “Why Rust?”: I’m a strong believer in using the compiler to help eliminate bugs. No programming language can eliminate all bugs and even the best designed language will typically need to leave developers plenty of wiggle room to shoot themselves in the foot. Still, there’s significant value in safety and long term maintainability of projects that use languages with this focus.

read more

Thoughtbot Icon Thoughtbot

Upcase (from Thoughtbot) is now free

But…why? We’ve loved building Upcase, both as a business and as a way to share what we’ve learned with the community. But while we’d love to keep investing in Upcase and producing tons of new content, we’ve been moving in a different direction—back to our roots, in fact, as we focus on our core consulting business. So what to do with this learning platform we’ve poured our hearts and souls into? We ultimately decided the best option was to open Upcase up to the world and share all of the content, no subscription needed. As they say, if you truly love something, set it free. Focus is SOOO crucial and sometimes is overlooked for too long. Been there. Glad to see the wisdom of focus here being shared (freely) from Thoughtbot. We’ve always been huge fans of their leadership in the community.

read more

Alex Buzin Hackernoon

Writing a JavaScript tweening engine with Between.js

Alex Buzin: A month ago I decided to try my skills in writing own tweening engine and here’s how I did it… Tweening, in case you’re wondering, is the process of animating an object from one position to another. You specify the start/end positions (or images) and the tweening engine handles all of the inbetween states. This post by Alex is a great way to introduce yourself to the topic.

read more

Emily Freeman emilyfreeman.io

Growth in fear

You should plan 10 minutes and read this story from Emily Freeman. Here are some highlights I enjoyed hearing her speak about. On growing up and being poor… Because I was poor, I was nothing. On why she’s in tech… Life, in many ways, is a write-only database. On being a house-wife… I felt like a failure. I was clever, I had worked hard and yet there I was again — worth nothing. On being a mom… Giving birth was the first time I felt truly powerful. On learning… Hard work beats talent when talent doesn’t work hard.

read more

Kristen Senz hbswk.hbs.edu

Learn by contributing

This post on Harvard Business School’s Working Knowledge from Kristen Senz gives us insights into the process of learning by contributing to open source. This comes from a recent study conducted by Frank Nagle, “Learning by Contributing: Gaining Competitive Advantage Through Contribution to Crowdsourced Public Goods.” Kristen quotes Frank saying: What this study shines a light on is that the companies that contribute and give back learn how to better use the open source software in their own environment. A lot of the research I do looks at the question, can the company be better off but also leave the world better off? While this study is focused on large organizations, in future research Nagle plans to study the effects of learning by contributing on smaller firms and startups.

read more

0:00 / 0:00