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Vim github.com

Play PacVim to learn Vim

Jamal Moon writes in the readme: Vim is a great tool to write and edit code, but many people, including me, struggled with the steep learning curve. I did not find a fun, free way to learn about the vim commands in-depth, and thus, PacVim was born. Inspired by the classic, PacMan, PacVim is a game that'll give anyone plenty of practice with the vim commands while being a ton of fun to play. Download and build the game with macOS and Linux.

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Matías Olivera warrior.js.org

WarriorJS – an exciting game of programming and Artificial Intelligence

A JavaScript game you play from the terminal: In WarriorJS, you wear the skin of a warrior climbing a tall tower to reach The JavaScript Sword at the top level. Legend has it that the sword bearer becomes enlightened in the JavaScript language, but be warned: the journey will not be easy. On each floor, you need to write JavaScript to instruct the warrior to battle enemies, rescue captives, and reach the stairs alive... Whether are new to programming or a JS guru, WarriorJS will put your skills to the test. Will you dare? Check out the gameplay docs to get a feel for things. This could be a lot of fun!

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Brad Frost bradfrost.com

My struggle to learn React

Brad Frost shared lessons learned after Dan Abramov reached out when he saw Dan tweet in frustration about learning React. Brad Frost writes on his personal blog: Dan has been hugely helpful at helping me unpack React, its ecosystem, its syntax, and its conventions. My first conversation with Dan allowed me to do some soul searching as to why I’ve been having such a tough time learning React. Turns out, the reasons for my inability to wrap my head around React are many... If you have or you are struggling to learn React, maybe you'll resonate with Brad's story.

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Glitch Icon Glitch

Glitch celebrates v1.0 with a week of major announcements

Today Glitch, the “friendly community where you’ll build the app of your dreams”, is officially “tearing off the beta label”. To celebrate, they’ve made a major announcement each day this week. The announcements include Glitch for Teams, “Making Learning to Code More Accessible” by adding embed support, “Tackling the Biggest Pain Points in Web Development” by adding things like “full-stack view source”, “Reinventing Version Control with Glitch Rewind”, and open-sourcing the Glitch.com app which will allow the community to remix the site to suggest ideas. Glitch is super exciting to me. Their efforts to make development more accessible, appealing, and fun will likely have profound effects on the community in the coming years.

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Miguel Piedrafita coderyouth.club

CoderYouth - a code community for teenagers by teenagers

Miguel Piedrafita –a 16-year old developer– is building a community for his likeminded-peers. CoderYouth is a teenager-only community, that is, you can only register if you are under 20. This community is exclusive by design. On its face that exclusivity cane be a bit off-putting, but I understand what they're trying to do. In short, when you learn to code at a young age, your friends aren't interested, so in CoderYouth you can connect with others with the same interests as you. Right now CoderYouth consists of just a forum and a GitHub org. The forum has a fair bit of activity happening, so he may be on to something...

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project Icon github.com

Bitwise – learn by creating the software/hardware for a computer from scratch

Per Vognsen has started live streaming daily while he builds a computer from scratch. The backstory: After working as a game developer and systems programmer for over 15 years at places like Epic Games, NVIDIA, RAD Game Tools and most recently Oculus, I decided it was time to take a break from professional programming and spend a few years pursuing a long-time dream of mine, a project I've dubbed Bitwise, where I want to share my passion and try to demonstrate by example how to build systems from scratch, with a low-level computing focus. Sounds super cool, but also overwhelming. Did he really say, "spend a few years"? For a project that ambitious, you gotta have goals: My goal with Bitwise is to show that these things can be done much more simply and quickly than people realize if we strongly favor simplicity over marginal gains in feature completeness or performance. The goal is not to outdo or compete with any existing product; the goal is to show how things work with real hardware and software. I'm sold. I subscribed us to his Twitch channel and look forward to following along!

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Practices exple.tive.org

Why do programmers start counting at zero?

Mike Hoye dives deep to answer this question: By now your peripheral vision should have convinced you that this is a long article... He's right. This piece looked so long that I kept it open in a tab (the original Instapaper) for a couple of weeks before reading it. But it's not so bad! And the topic is fascinating: starting at 1 is not an unreasonable position at all; to a typical human thinking about the zeroth element of an array doesn’t make any more sense than trying to catch the zeroth bus that comes by, but we’ve clearly ended up here somehow. So what’s the story there? My head canon on the topic treats zero-indexing in terms of offsets. How much of an offset do you need to reach the first entry in the array? Zero. How much for the second? One. Turns out, nope that's not why!

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Ethereum github.com

Mastering Ethereum 📖

The book isn't due for publication by O'Reilly until Q4 of this year, but content and progress is publicly available on GitHub today. Here's the skinny: a book for developers, offering a guide to the operation and use of the Ethereum, Ethereum Classic, RootStock (RSK) and other compatible EVM-based open blockchains. Co-authored by Andreas Antonopoulos and Gavin Wood, Mastering Ethereum has a high chance of being excellent. 👌

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React github.com

An interactive, explorable explanation about the peculiar magic of sound waves

This interactive guide introduces and explores waveforms. It covers how to read waveform graphs, goes over the fundamental physics of sound, teaches how it relates to music and harmony, and demonstrates how to build complex tones from simple ones. Even if you don't care how waveforms work, check it out for the quality of the experience alone. Built with React, Styled Components, and SVG.

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Indie Hackers Icon Indie Hackers

Am I too old to do a coding bootcamp?

Imposter syndrome is alive and well. It's up to us, the community, to fight back against the voice inside our heads telling us we don't belong, or we can't do it. Here are some of my favorite responses... Never too old. Do it! I'm 60 years old and just launched my own venture... You don't have to "fit into the tech scene" to be a developer. I was 33 when I went through a coding boot camp after almost 16 years of being a fire fighter...that was 4 years ago. I'm currently in a coding bootcamp and I'm 36 years old. I'm 71 and I program every day. You are !imposter

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DEV.to Icon DEV.to

Linked Lists — a BaseCS video series

Vaideji Joshi has teamed up with our friends at dev.to to produce an awesome educational video series to accompany her awesome CodeNewbie podcast of the same name. The first series is on Linked Lists. Here's the pitch: You might have heard about linked lists, or you might think that you're supposed to know about them. Maybe you do know a little bit about them, but don't know why you should care or why they matter. Either way, I want to tell you about why they're so cool. More like this, please! 🙏

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