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Donald Fischer Tidelift

The data behind Microsoft's surprising open source track record

Our friends at Tidelift have joined data from GitHub and their own Libraries.io, "the largest open source software dataset in the world," — which covers over 2.8 million open source projects. They were able to combine the two datasets to gather the entire commit history of each project on GitHub to more closely examine the following questions: What exactly has been Microsoft’s role in the open source community? In which projects and ecosystems have they contributed most? Have those contributions been focused on the large Microsoft open source initiatives, or has the company also participated in projects beyond their immediate purview? They were also careful to clean the dataset of forks and duplicate packages which would misinform this analysis. So what’s the verdict? Microsoft may have a mixed history with open source, but today the company is demonstrating some impressive traction when it comes to open source community contributions. If we are to judge the company on its recent actions, the data shows what Satya Nadella said in his announcement about Microsoft being “all in on open source” is more than just words.

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GitLab Icon GitLab

Apple just announced Xcode 10 is now integrated with GitLab

No other details were shared in this tweet, but this image from the stage of WWDC says all it needs to. In a post-Microsoft + GitHub world — it has been a crazy 24 hours for GitLab. More than 2,000 people tweeted about #movingtogitlab. We imported over 100,000 repositories, and we've seen a 7x increase in orders. We went live on Bloomberg TV. And on top of that, Apple announced an Xcode integration with GitLab. Here's an interesting exchange between Emily Chang and Sid Sijbrandij on Bloomberg Technology: Emily: I spoke with Satya Nadella earlier today, and he said "he promises to put developers first." Do you not believe him, or do you think it's not possible for a company with so many objectives to really put developers first? Sid: I believe him. Microsoft has shown that it is the new Microsoft, and they've done great. The new CEO, Nat Friedman, shows he really understands developers. So I believe him when he says they are going to be good maintainers of GitHub. Emily: So, then what's so bad about GitHub? Sid: There's nothing bad about GitHub. Emily: What’s so much better about GitLab? Sid: It's a fundamentally different product. It's open core, so a lot of it is open source. You can host it yourself. But second and I think most importantly, it's not just code hosting. With GitHub you host your code. GitLab is the entire DevOps lifecycle. So all the way from planning something to rolling it out, container registries, monitoring — all in a single product. That allows you to get the whole organization on the same page. And that's why people are flocking to it. They go on to talk about being a sustainable business, financials, etc.

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YouTube Icon YouTube

Satya Nadella on "Why Microsoft bought GitHub"

If you haven't yet, you should watch this. It's 8 minutes long and packed with insights from Sataya himself on why Microsoft bought GitHub. We are all in on open source and that's what really brings us together with GitHub — and we're going to operate as an open platform for any language, any framework, whether it's the cloud or on the client. Nat Friedman, who's going to be the CEO of GitHub post close, came to Microsoft from Xamarin — he's someone who's a veteran of open source and he's going to lead the company. We're going to operate GitHub as an open platform, and most developers are going to judge us by our recent actions and our actions going forward — and we will have to earn the trust everyday. We're very committed to it. At the core, Microsoft is a developer tools company. This is something that comes very natural to us. Earning the trust of our customers by our actions everyday is what we live by. The most important thing is that it's not just about Azure. We welcome every cloud provider to integrate with GitHub in order to be able to reach the GitHub community — and give GitHub members a choice of any cloud, as well as any client, mobile platform, or IoT platform.

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Chris Wanstrath GitHub

A bright future for GitHub (at Microsoft)

The news is true. Microsoft is acquiring GitHub and is expecting the agreement to close by the end of the year. Chris Wanstrath writes on the GitHub blog: When GitHub first launched ten years ago, I could have never imagined this headline. Their focus is on the long tail and the developer. What hasn’t changed, however, is our focus on the developer. From the beginning, we have been obsessed with building a product for the people using it. We want to make developers more productive and we want more people to become developers. So as we look to the next decade of software development and beyond, we know it’s all about the developer. The relationship that has formed between GitHub and Microsoft is years in the making. ...as we’ve gotten to know the team at Microsoft over the past few years through collaborating on projects from Git LFS to Electron, we’ve learned that they agree. Their work on open source has inspired us, the success of the Minecraft and LinkedIn acquisitions has shown us they are serious about growing new businesses well, and the growth of Azure has proven they are an innovative development platform. Better together. ...most importantly, we both believe we can do greater things together than alone As part of this change, Nat Friedman will be taking on the role of GitHub’s CEO. We have been searching for a new CEO for some time and found in both Microsoft and Nat a partner we believe will strengthen and grow the GitHub community and company over the next few years. We have been in the trenches for years covering the dramatic shift of Microsoft. Here's a fairly comprehensive list of our coverage shared in an issue on a trending repo on GitHub. If for some reason that issue gets deleted I have archived the list here.

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Microsoft News Icon Microsoft News

Yes, Microsoft will buy GitHub (for a cool $7.5 billion)

Well, it's official. The only thing standing between us and a Microsoft-owned GitHub future is regulatory review. The implications of this acquisition are broad-sweeping, but the way it'll actually play out is still unclear. Here's what Satya Nadella says: We recognize the community responsibility we take on with this agreement and will do our best work to empower every developer to build, innovate and solve the world’s most pressing challenges. Addressing one of the big questions on developers' minds, Microsoft states: GitHub will retain its developer-first ethos and will operate independently to provide an open platform for all developers in all industries. Developers will continue to be able to use the programming languages, tools and operating systems of their choice for their projects — and will still be able to deploy their code to any operating system, any cloud and any device. I'm not quite sure what operate independently means in practice. GitHub has been searching for a CEO for months now. How independent do they want to remain?

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Business Insider Icon Business Insider

Will Microsoft buy GitHub?

On Friday, Business Insider reported that Microsoft has held talks to buy GitHub. Matt Weinberger writes for Business Insider: GitHub is a $2 billion startup that claims 24 million software developers as users. On the most surface level, the logic of Microsoft buying GitHub is pretty clear. Developers love GitHub, and Microsoft needs the love of developers. Here's the current speculation... If Microsoft were to acquire GitHub, it would mark a significant change of course from where the startup stood just six months ago. As recently as late 2017, insiders said GitHub was fully committed to staying independent and eventually going public. It's also possible that instead of striking a deal to buy GitHub outright, Microsoft may make an investment — possibly with an option to buy — and allow one of its top engineers to be poached as CEO. h/t Dan McClain for sharing this in Slack.

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Julia White Avatar The Changelog #298

The beginnings of Microsoft Azure

We're on location at Microsoft Build 2018 talking with Julia White, Corporate Vice President at Microsoft — a 17 year Microsoft veteran. We talked with Julia about her take on this “new Microsoft”, Satya Nadella's first appearance as CEO when they revealed the first glimpse of Microsoft’s cloud offering which started with Office, the beginnings of Microsoft Azure, Azure as the world’s computer, and how every company is becoming a software company.

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Azure IoT Edge runtime

At Build 2018 Microsoft open sourced their Azure IoT Edge runtime to give developers the ability to create smart edge applications. The announcement came, but it seems the readme on the repo says it is pending an official open source release. The second version of Azure IoT Edge is in public preview. We intend to open source the code when the product enters general availability and will place the code here. Either way, we're excited about what's to come.

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PJ Meyer Avatar Chris Dias Avatar Julia Liuson Avatar The Changelog #277

The Story of Visual Studio Code with Julia Liuson, Chris Dias, and PJ Meyer

We're back in NYC at Microsoft Connect(); talking about the backstory of Visual Studio Code with Julia Liuson (Corporate Vice President of Visual Studio), Chris Dias (Principal Program Manager of Visual Studio and .NET), and PJ Meyer (Product Manager). We talk about the beginnings of the Visual Studio product line, how Microsoft missed the internet, how the community is judging Microsoft and looking at them with a very old lense, how Visual Studio Code evolved from lessons learned with their cloud based editor called Monaco, how they had to radically change to reach developers beyond Windows, and how this open source project is thriving.

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