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Practical AI Practical AI #97

MLOps and tracking experiments with Allegro AI

DevOps for deep learning is well… different. You need to track both data and code, and you need to run multiple different versions of your code for long periods of time on accelerated hardware. Allegro AI is helping data scientists manage these workflows with their open source MLOps solution called Trains. Nir Bar-Lev, Allegro’s CEO, joins us to discuss their approach to MLOps and how to make deep learning development more robust.

Ops github.com

Quickly spin up local development environments with Lando

This tool is surrounded by mountains of marketing speak, but it does seem like it offers a quick way to spin up different dev environments, which is cool. It has built-in recipes for WordPress, Drupal, LAMP, MEAN, and more. Here’s how you get started on Drupal 7, for example:

lando init \
  --source remote \
  --remote-url https://ftp.drupal.org/files/projects/drupal-7.59.tar.gz \
  --remote-options="--strip-components 1" \
  --recipe drupal7 --webroot . \
  --name hello-drupal7

You can use these out of the box or start with a base language and mix in the things you need from there. Kinda like Docker Compose? Yeah, kinda like Docker Compose:

You can think of Lando as both an abstraction layer and superset of Docker Compose as well as a Docker Compose utility.

The New Stack Icon The New Stack

The 3 myths of observability

Arijit Mukherji on The New Stack:

We all have our favorite urban legends. From cow tipping to chupacabras, these myths persist despite a lack of definitive proof (and often evidence to the contrary). Technology isn’t immune to this phenomenon. It has its own set of urban legends and myths that emerge alongside new technologies and continue well into mass adoption. As organizations consider the shift from monitoring to Observability, I hear three common misperceptions. It’s time to debunk the myths.

Callback: Observability is for your unknown unknowns

The Changelog The Changelog #356

Observability is for your unknown unknowns

Christine Yen (co-founder and CEO of Honeycomb) joined the show to talk about her upcoming talk at Strange Loop titled “Observability: Superpowers for Developers.” We talk practically about observability and how it delivers on these superpowers. We also cover the biggest hurdles to observability, the cultural shifts needed in teams to implement observability, and even the gains the entire organization can enjoy when you deliver high-quality code and you’re able to respond to system failure with resilience.

Linux devconnected.com

The complete system administrator guide to Syslog

If you are a system administrator, or just a regular Linux user, there is a very high chance that you worked with Syslog, at least one time. On your Linux system, pretty much everything related to system logging is linked to the Syslog protocol. Designed in the early 80’s by Eric Allman (from Berkeley University), the syslog protocol is a specification that defines a standard for message logging on any system.

This is pitched as “everything that you need to know about Syslog.” From what I can tell, it might just live up to that pitch. It’s high quality and thorough.

Aymen Medium

The missing introduction to containerization

Containerization technologies are one of the trendiest topics in the cloud economy and the IT ecosystem. The container ecosystem can be confusing at times, this post may help you understand some confusing concepts about Docker and containers. We are also going to see how the containerization ecosystem evolved and the state of containerization in 2019.

Put on your swimming suit, because this is a deep dive. 🏊‍♀️🏊

Rod Johnson changelog.com/posts

Evolving understanding of software delivery

Two new terms have recently emerged around software delivery: Software Defined Delivery and Progressive Delivery. Why? How do they relate to Continuous Delivery?

Several forces today make delivery increasingly complex. Notably, proliferation of repositories, with hundreds of small projects replacing a handful of monoliths; desire for greater automation to realize the full potential of CD across multiple environments; the rise of feature flagging; and increased evidence (such as the Equifax debacle) of the need to bake security into the delivery process.

Matthias Endler matthias-endler.de

Maybe you don't need Kubernetes

There’s another gorilla to consider for container orchestration.

Kubernetes is the 800-pound gorilla of container orchestration. It powers some of the biggest deployments worldwide, but it comes with a price tag.

Especially for smaller teams, it can be time-consuming to maintain and has a steep learning curve. For what our team of four wanted to achieve at trivago, it added too much overhead. So we looked into alternatives — and fell in love with Nomad.

From the Nomad website:

HashiCorp Nomad is a single binary that schedules applications and services on Linux, Windows, and Mac. It is an open source scheduler that uses a declarative job file for scheduling virtualized, containerized, and standalone applications.

Anyone from the community with experience using Nomad? Let us know in the discussion below.

Ops rework.fm

Basecamp details biggest outage yet in episode of Rework podcast

Who knew an audio post-mortem could be so fun to listen to!

On Thursday, November 8, Basecamp 3 went down for almost five hours. It was the worst outage to hit the company in a decade and a stress test of Basecamp’s practices around internal communication, customer support, and calm work. Today’s episode goes inside the company on November 8 to see how the outage unfolded.

Cloud crossplane.io

Crossplane – the open source multicloud control plane

Crossplane provides a universal cloud computing API. Control your workloads across clouds and on-prem environments from one unified place.

Nobody wants to be locked in to their current cloud provider. With Crossplane (and a new breed of ‘multi-cloud’ tools like it), you can spread your application across multiple cloud providers at a single time, migrate managed services across multiple clouds, and more.

We might be looking at the future of cloud computing, right here. I’m sure this will be a hot subject at this week’s KubeCon in Seattle.

(Adam is onsite covering the event. Find him and say hi if you’re attending.)

Sid Sijbrandij GitLab

How GitLab CI compares with the three variants of Jenkins

Sid Sijbrandij and the team at GitLab compared GitLab CI with the three Jenkins variants. Here’s what they learned…

The many plugin combinations for Jenkins has made Legacy Jenkins hard to configure and brittle when updating. Cloudbees is introducing two new versions of Jenkins to remedy the problem: Cloud Native Jenkins will start from scratch, while Jenkins Evergreen will focus on a set of essential plugins. GitLab CI adds new functionality in the main code base, avoiding the need for needless configuration and ensuring everything still works when updating.

Also to note — according to a recent Forrester report GitLab CI and Jenkins/Cloudbees are two of the four leading products for CI.

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