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PHP is a scripting language that works particularly well for server-side web development.
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PHP github.com

A completely open source ngrok alternative

Expose is a beautiful, open source, tunnel application that allows you to share your local websites with others via the internet.

Since you can host the server yourself, you have full control over the domains that your shared sites will be available at. You can extend expose with additional features and middleware classes on the server and client side, to make it suit your specific needs.

Alan Shreve closed ngrok’s source code years ago, and every now-and-again an open source alternative pops on the scene. Add Expose to the list. It’s written in PHP and has a nice shine on it. But which of these SSH tunneling tools is best in class?

A completely open source ngrok alternative

The Changelog The Changelog #321

Drupal is a pretty big deal

Adam and Jerod talk with Angie Byron, a core contributor and staple of the Drupal community. We haven’t covered Drupal really (sorry about that), but the call with Angie was inspiring! From the background, to the tech, the usage of the software, the communication at all levels of the community — Drupal is doing something SO RIGHT, and we’re happy to celebrate with them as they march on to the “Framelication” beat of their own drum.

Go github.com

A high-performance PHP app server, load balancer, and process manager

RoadRunner is an open source (MIT licensed), high-performance PHP application server, load balancer and process manager. It supports running as a service with the ability to extend its functionality on a per-project basis.

RoadRunner is written in Go, and can be used to replace the class Nginx+FPM setup, boasting “much greater performance”. I’d love to see some benchmarks. Better yet, I’d love to see someone use this in production for a bit and write up their experience.

Go changelog.com/posts

Generate 4 language bindings for your API in one Go

You just built an API, and want to make sure everyone can use it. Building libraries in every language isn’t only going to be hard, its going to take a lot of time. Time you don’t have. This is where Alpaca can help.

You define your API according to the format, alpaca builds the API libraries along with their documentation. All you have to do is publishing them to their respective package managers.

Right now it can generate API clients in PHP, Python, Ruby, and JavaScript. You can see examples of the generated client libraries here. I can’t speak to the quality of all the generated language bindings, but I took a cursory look at the Python lib and it looks good. Looks like Alpaca could save us all a lot of time.

PHP changelog.com/posts

PredictionIO, a machine learning server for software developers and data engineers.

Want to add personalization such as recommendations or content discovery to your application? PredictionIO has your back.

You can download and install the server yourself or use their cloud infrastructure. Clients already exist for Java, PHP, Python, and Ruby, and I assume more are on the way.

Check out all of their open source goods right here.

PHP changelog.com/posts

Meet Boris, a tiny REPL for PHP

Chris Corbyn was frustrated with PHP’s lack of a good REPL, so he took matters into his own hands and created Boris. I can relate to Chris’s experience. Back when I used to write WordPress plugins I got so frustrated by the lack of a Rails-like interactive console that I created one for WordPress.

Boris is cooler than my little plugin because it works outside of WordPress and runs directly in your terminal. Check it out in action:

You can install Boris via Packagist or use it directly by cloning the repo:

git clone git://github.com/d11wtq/boris.git
cd boris
./bin/boris

This and much more information about the REPL is available in the README. Boris is MIT licensed and hosted on GitHub.

JavaScript changelog.com/posts

Bring your server side debug logging into the browser with Chrome Logger

If you find yourself jumping back and forth between Chrome’s Dev Tools and a terminal displaying your server side request logs, Craig Campbell’s Chrome Logger might be just the thing you need!

It’s a Chrome extension which lets you see your server side logs right in the browser. There are currently libraries for:

Is your server side language/environment of choice not on that list? Don’t worry, Chrome Logger uses an open and published protocol so you can easily write client libraries of your own!

See the project’s home page for more info or check under the hood if you’re curious about how it all works.

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