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Safari adage.com

Apple's new anti-tracking feature in Safari takes toll

The irony here is that the site we’re linking to for this story is FULL of display ads. The web and mobile web for content sites, blogs, and the like tend to borderline on a confusing and/or terrible experience because of ads, modals, takeover screens, content that seems like content but is just content in disguise…then, THEN…the retargeting. I can see why Apple, with their focus on the users privacy, that this feature is a Safari thing and being lead by Apple. The feature—blandly dubbed “Intelligent Tracking Prevention,” or “ITP 2”— is the second major iteration of its anti-tracking tool, which was first introduced last year. The update prevents marketers from targeting Safari users across the web. For example, someone who visits Nike’s website can’t be targeted elsewhere on the web, such as Google search or the New York Times website. I’m all for websites finding ways to make money from smart relationships, partnerships, and “ads,” but they must be delivered in well-mannered and tasteful ways that does not objectify the reader or their privacy.

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EFF Icon EFF

Google Chrome’s users take a back seat to its bottom line

In the documents that define how the Web works, a browser is called a user agent. It’s supposed to be the thing that acts on your behalf in cyberspace. If the massive data collection appetite of Google’s advertising- and tracking-based business model are incentivizing Chrome to act in Google’s best interest instead of yours, that’s a big problem—one that consumers and regulators should not ignore. It’s no surprise that privacy-focused browser alternatives are gaining ground in the quest to be your user agent. This coming week, we’re sitting down with Brave’s CTO for what should turn out to be a fascinating episode of The Changelog. Stay tuned for that.

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John Gruber daringfireball.net

Daring Fireball on Facebook giving advertisers your shadow contact info

Commentary on commentary here, but seriously — we obviously track news on privacy and security — Gruber’s paraphrase from Kashmir Hill’s post on Gizmodo is priceless. Here is Gruber’s take… Hill: Facebook, are you doing this terrible thing? Facebook: No, we don’t do that. Hill, months later: Here’s academic research that shows you do this terrible thing. Facebook: Yes, of course we do that. I agree with Gruber on Facebook being a morally criminal enterprise. Also, I try to avoid Facebook, aside from my wife’s usage, at all costs. I’m even leery of Instagram, which is sad because one of my professional hobbies is photography. Gruber says: At this point I consider Facebook a criminal enterprise. Maybe not legally, but morally. How in the above scenario is Facebook not stealing Ben’s privacy?

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Medium Icon Medium

An Efail postmortem

Efail caused a panic at the disco: … some researchers in Europe published a paper with the bombshell title “Efail: Breaking S/MIME and OpenPGP Email Encryption using Exfiltration Channels.” There were a lot of researchers on that team but in the hours after release Sebastian Schinzel took the point on Twitter for the group. Oh, my, did the email crypto world blow up. The following are some thoughts that have benefited from a few days for things to settle. Lots of interesting insights here, perhaps most controversially how the EFF’s handling of the situation may have done more harm than good in the author’s opinion. Also: we could stand to have a renewed appreciation for OpenPGP’s importance to not just email crypto, but the global economy. I can say I definitely have more appreciation for it after reading this than I did before. I hadn’t thought about its influence (which is huge) outside of encrypted email.

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Zack Whittaker zdnet.com

I asked Apple for all my data. Here's what was sent back.

Zack Whittaker writes for Zero Day: Apple gave me all the data it collected on me since I bought my first iPhone — in 2010. This is what has largely stood out to me in the ongoing discussion about what data the four have on me and how they use it… As insightful as it was, Apple’s treasure trove of my personal data is a drop in the ocean to what social networks or search giants have on me, because Apple is primarily a hardware maker and not ad-driven, like Facebook and Google, which use your data to pitch you ads. Want to request your data? It takes just a few seconds…

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Cloudflare Blog Icon Cloudflare Blog

Cloudflare announces 1.1.1.1 - the fastest, privacy-first consumer DNS service

For those wanting to 86 8.8.8.8, here’s the 411 on 1.1.1.1. They’re making some pretty big claims here. One is that it’s fast (which DNSPerf corroborates). The other big claim is that it’s “privacy-first”. This one is a bit harder to corroborate but their promise is pretty convincing: We will never log your IP address (the way other companies identify you). And we’re not just saying that. We’ve retained KPMG to audit our systems annually to ensure that we’re doing what we say. If you care about speed and privacy (you should) there is a good chance you should consider switching to this.

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