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Michael del Castillo forbes.com

Shell invests in Ethereum

This is a really interesting usage of blockchain technology to ensure you are really getting what you think you bought. Michael del Castillo writes on Forbes.com: The fifth-largest oil and gas company in the world, valued at $262 billion, is investing an undisclosed amount in LO3, a New York startup using a modified version of the ethereum blockchain to make it easier for individuals to buy and sell locally produced energy using the existing network of power cables. While the bitcoin blockchain lets users track the flow of value without the need of banks to audit the system, LO3’s platform, called Exergy, is designed to track the flow of energy as it is added to a shared, local energy network, giving the neighbors who purchase the energy absolute certainty it really came from a windmill, a solar panel or a gerbil running on a treadmill.

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Founders Talk Founders Talk #67

Mastering the art of quitting

Lynne Tye is the founder of Key Values, a platform where developers find engineering teams that share their values. To be more precise, Lynne is a solo-founder. She’s also a team of one. Lynne’s path to becoming a founder was anything but typical. She had plans to follow in her parent’s and sister’s footsteps to go into academia, and got two years into pursuing her PhD in Neuroscience before she made one of the best choices in her life — she quit. Lynne has mastered the art of quitting, at the right time of course, and she’s used that art as her secret weapon in her quest to become a founder.

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Thomas Claburn theregister.co.uk

npm, Inc settled its labor rights union-busting battle

With the settlement behind it, NPM Inc can now turn its attention toward repairing relationships with the JavaScript community and generating enough revenue to sustain itself. I’d like to know what the current sentiment is towards npm after this settlement. Can they mend these community fences? Or, are you more hopeful of the “development of alternative technologies” as mentioned in this post?

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Startups defmacro.org

Startup idea checklist

I’ve been tinkering with different startup ideas and needed a good checklist to think through them. There are great templates for this already: The YC application, Amazon’s internal press release, and Sequoia’s Writing a Business Plan. I found myself mixing and tweaking these templates because they don’t exactly match my model of the world, so I wrote up my own list. These are great questions to ask yourself when you’re dreaming up an open source project as well.

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Cryptocurrency libra.org

Welcome to Libra?

Facebook, VISA, Uber, and A16Z (amongst others) have officially announced their cryptocurrency: Reinvent money. Transform the global economy. So people everywhere can live better lives. Color me skeptical. Not of the value of cryptocurrencies writ large, but in the actors and entities behind this particular coin. One thing I believe to be true, though: ten years from now our idea of (and interaction with) money will be dramatically different than it is today.

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Security troyhunt.com

The future of Have I Been Pwned

Troy Hunt: It’s time for HIBP to grow up. It’s time to go from that one guy doing what he can in his available time to a better-resourced and better-funded structure that’s able to do way more than what I ever could on my own. HIBP is an international treasure, IMHO. It’s pretty cool to see how it has transformed Troy’s life along the way: HIBP may only be less than 6 years old, but it’s the culmination of a life’s work. I still have these vivid memories stretching back to the mid-90’s when I first started building software for the web and had a dream of creating something big; “Isn’t it amazing that I can sit here at home and write code that could have a real impact on the world one day”

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Founders Talk Founders Talk #66

Failing to build a billion-dollar company

Sahil Lavingia is the founder and CEO of Gumroad, a platform for creators to sell the things they make. Since 2011 Gumroad has sent over $200 million dollars to creators. That’s a big number. Sahil’s ambitions lead him to believe that Gumroad would become a billion-dollar company, have hundreds of employees, and eventually IPO. That didn’t happen. …we were venture-funded, which was like playing a game of double-or-nothing. It’s euphoric when things are going your way — and suffocating when they’re not. And we weren’t doubling fast enough to raise the $15M+ Series B we were looking for to grow the team. For the type of business we were trying to build, every month of less than 20 percent growth should have been a red flag. But at the time, I thought it was okay… We talk through Sahil’s journey with Gumroad, why it failed to meet his goals, the path he’s on today and the things he now values…but to understand why Gumroad didn’t live up to his expectations, we really have to understand the backstory of Gumroad.

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Founders Talk Founders Talk #65

What are you optimizing for?

Saron Yitbarek is the founder and CEO of CodeNewbie — one of the most supportive community of programmers and people learning to code. Saron hosts the CodeNewbie podcast, Command Line Heroes from Red Hat, and she’s also the creator of Codeland Conference taking place on July 22 this year in New York City. We talk through getting started, lessons learned, mental health, developing and running a conference…but our conversation begins with a pivotal question asked of Saron…“What are you optimizing for?”

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GitHub dependabot.com

Dependabot has been acquired by GitHub

More news out of today’s GitHub Satellite event, this time from a security angle. The implications of this acquisition from the horse’s mouth: We’re integrating Dependabot directly into GitHub, starting with security fix PRs 👮‍♂️ You can still install Dependabot from the GitHub Marketplace whilst we integrate it into GitHub, but it’s now free of charge 🎁 We’ve doubled the size of Dependabot’s team; expect lots of great improvements over the coming months 👩‍💻👨‍💻👩‍💻👨‍💻👩‍💻👨‍💻 Congrats to Grey, Harry and Philip!

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Founders Talk Founders Talk #64

Building a hardware/software product company

Colin Billings is the founder and CEO of Orro where they’ve built the first truly intelligent home lighting system. It knows when you’re in the room, and adjusts the lights automatically for you. But Colin’s path to starting this company wasn’t a straight line. Like most innovative products, Orro has an interesting beginning — after-all, they’re going up against the giants.

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Andy Sparks holloway.com

Fundamentals of product-market fit

For the entrepreneurial type: this is a great dive into the fundamentals of product-market fit by @sparkszilla. The whole read is worth it if you’re interested in raising funds in the future. The heart of the article stems from three axiomatic theories: Rachleff’s Law of Startup Success: Rachleff says, “The #1 company-killer is lack of market. When a great team meets a lousy market, market wins. When a lousy team meets a great market, market wins. When a great team meets a great market, something special happens.” Rachleff’s Corollary of Startup Success: “The only thing that matters is getting to product-market fit.” BPMF and APMF: The lives of startups are divided into two categories, before product-market fit (BPMF) and after product-market fit (APMF). And the Vohra questionnaire to see if you have PMF is one I’ll keep on hand for the future. 👌

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Founders Talk Founders Talk #63

Zero up-front costs for a CS education

What would be the impact on the world if a Computer Science education was available to you completely free of charge until you get a job in that field paying $50,000 or more? That’s the question that drives Austen Allred and the team behind Lambda School. Lambda School is a revolutionary new school that invests in its students and they completely align their interests with their students. Seems like a novel idea, right? But Austen’s path to Silicon Valley was where things began for him, so that’s where we’ll start today’s conversation.

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Founders Talk Founders Talk #62

Entrepreneurship in medicine

Dr. Steve Hotze is the founder and CEO of the Hotze Health & Wellness Center in Houston, TX where they’ve helped more than 30,000 patients to take charge of their health. But Steve Hotze is more than just a doctor — he’s an entrepreneur and a pioneer who has spent his career pushing back on the HMO’s, PPO’s, insurance companies, and big-pharma to build a medical practice that’s focused on one thing…the patient’s health.

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Austen Allred lambdaschool.com

Lambda School is giving an $18,000 stipend to select students

Austen Allred, Co-founder and CEO of Lambda School, writing on why they’re doing this: Our goal at Lambda School is to help our student really succeed to the best of their ability and to remove the barriers that are currently preventing more people from being able to access a high tech education - and the career, financial, impact and other benefits that come with it. We know that one of the hardest parts of deciding to go back to school is figuring out how to make it work without a full time salary. By launching this Living Stipend Pilot Program, we are looking at how we can create more products and innovative ways to help support our current students - and to expand who can become a Lambda School student. They’re not looking at financials or credit scores, instead applications will be screened by asking just two questions as criteria for selection: Why do you need this living stipend to be successful as a Lambda School student? Tell us a bit about the unique part of your story that will make you a valuable addition to both the Lambda and tech community?

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NGINX nginx.com

NGINX has been acquired by F5

The path for a startup can have three outcomes: never fail and keep existing, get acquired, or IPO. For a commercial open source startup like NGINX, the matter gets a bit more complicated because attached to the company is the tech, the open source project, and the community. The transition is more than just an exit to a new stage, it requires a far more calculated choice to ensure things don’t change, too much. Change always happens. Gus Robertson, CEO of NGINX, writes: With today’s news, our vision and mission don’t change. We’re still helping customers build distributed application architectures. We’re still building a platform that optimizes ingress‑egress traffic and APIs. And we’re still helping companies on their journey to microservices. What does change is our trajectory. F5 shares our mission, vision, and values. But they bring to bear a tremendous amount of additional resources and complementary technologies. And make no mistake about it: F5 is committed to keeping the NGINX brand and open source technology alive. Without this commitment, the deal wouldn’t have happened for either side. Also, from the official announcement… …F5 will acquire all issued and outstanding shares of privately held NGINX for a total enterprise value of approximately $670 million, subject to certain adjustments.

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Simon Schultz changelog.com/posts

Why everyone should read support emails

What would happen if everyone in your company was reading and responding to incoming support emails? In this post, Simon Schultz shares why he spends more time on incoming support emails than internal reports, plus six good reasons you should do so as well. I love my numbers, and I love my spreadsheets, but the heart and soul of all the great people using and being in contact with your service, product and company are too often buried somewhere in a soulless column in your beloved spreadsheets. Valuable insights, information, and data are too often ignored and forgotten.

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Adam Stacoviak changelog.com/posts

The founders of Octobox are "walking a tightrope" as they move towards sustainability

Building an open source business is hard. Octobox co-founders Andrew Nesbitt and Benjamin Nickolls know this all too well. They’re walking a preverbal “tightrope” with the introduction of new pricing in order to move towards sustainability. By all accounts, Octobox is a success. It’s a thriving open source project that’s being adopted by the software community using GitHub. It has a growing community of maintainers and contributors. Organizations like Shopify run company-wide instances for their own use. Octobox is also run as a SaaS that hosts more than 11k users. But there’s one tiny little problem…Octobox is not sustainable (yet).

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Y Combinator Icon Y Combinator

What’s the second job of a startup CEO?

Most startup founders get stuck in their first job as a CEO. The key to getting past developing a good product and achieving product-market-fit is to develop a good company. As noted in this recent episode of Founders Talk with Isaac Schlueter, and this post from Ali Rowghani the CEO of Y Combinator Continuity, getting the company part is hard. Your first creation is a product, your second creation is a company. A Phase 1 startup CEO is the Doer-in-Chief. You must be deeply involved in both building the product and acquiring users/customers. A CEO’s first job is to build a great product and find a small group of people who love it and use it enthusiastically. As a Phase 2 CEO, you need to transition from “Doer-in-Chief” to “Company-Builder-in-Chief.” This is how you scale as a CEO, and CEO scaling is the first step in company-building. For most founders, this is very difficult. When you’ve been a successful Doer-in-Chief, it’s hard to stop.

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Founders Talk Founders Talk #61

Isaac Schlueter on building npm and hiring a CEO

With JavaScript in every corner of software development and npm in every corner right along with it, the rise of npm can be drawn as a hockey stick up and to the right with Isaac Schlueter at the top grinning ear to ear. After reading their recent announcement to hire a CEO, I knew it was time to talk one-on-one with Isaac about building npm and the journey of hiring his successor.

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Travis CI Blog Icon Travis CI Blog

Travis CI has been acquired

Congrats to our friends over at Travis CI. A dollar amount wasn’t mentioned for this acquisition and I don’t know enough of the backstory to be able to tell if this, is in fact a good thing or a bad thing for Travis CI. It sounds like there aren’t any planned changes coming out of the gate with the acquisition, so that’s a good start. Regarding the state of Travis CI open source, Konstantin had this to say… Open source is at the heart of Travis CI. We will continue to maintain a free, hosted service for open source projects, and will keep building features for the open source community. Additionally, our code will stay open source and under an MIT license. This is who we are, this is what made us successful.

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Y Combinator Icon Y Combinator

Now you can listen to Startup Playbook by Sam Altman (for free)

The book is free in Kindle format on Amazon AND you can listen for free on the web! We spend a lot of time advising startups. Though one-on-one advice will always be crucial, we thought it might help us scale Y Combinator if we could distill the most generalizable parts of this advice into a sort of playbook we could give YC and YC Fellowship companies. Then we thought we should just give it to everyone. This is meant for people new to the world of startups. Most of this will not be new to people who have read a lot of what YC partners have written—the goal is to get it into one place.

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Max Stoiber mxstbr.com

Regrets and lessons learned building Spectrum

Max Stoiber shares his regrets and lessons learned from tech choices made when building Spectrum. Yes, this is the same Spectrum recently acquired by GitHub. With the benefit of hindsight, here are the technology choices I regret and the lessons I have learned. … Changing these decisions would not have made Spectrum a better product by itself. Yet, it would have saved us time and allowed us to spend more time experimenting.

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Ben Thompson stratechery.com

The economic realities of open source

Ben Thompson, one of the voices behind Exponent and writer at Stratechery, covered the economic realities of open source from a lens of the music industry. More specifically, Ben talked about how the music industry’s revenue, medium, and distribution relates to that of open source in today’s world where AWS, Microsoft or Google are able to make money off of open source like MongoDB and Redis without having to share any of that money with the developers of the open source. He describes this conundrum for open source companies: MongoDB leveraged open source to gain mindshare. MongoDB Inc. built a successful company selling additional tools for enterprises to run MongoDB. More and more enterprises don’t want to run their own software: they want to hire AWS (or Microsoft or Google) to run it for them, because they value performance, scalability, and availability. This leaves MongoDB Inc. not unlike the record companies after the advent of downloads: what they sold was not software but rather the tools that made that software usable, but those tools are increasingly obsolete as computing moves to the cloud.

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