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VS Code

Free and open source code editor that runs everywhere from Microsoft.
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Geoff Stevens software.com

Discover your most productive music for coding

Music Time brings the power of the Spotify player to your code editor. Control your music, view and create playlists, favorite and repeat songs, and discover new music without context switching to the Spotify web or desktop app.

Music Time is free and works with VS Code, Atom, and JetBrains IDEs. Some of its features require Spotify premium, but the personalized song recommendations work with the free version of Spotify as well. It even has a cool vizualizer so you can see your most productive songs.

Discover your most productive music for coding

Kubernetes github.com

Fully-baked, collaborative development environments in your browser

Tightly integrated with GitLab, GitHub, and Bitbucket, Gitpod automatically and continuously prebuilds dev environments for all your branches. As a result, team members can instantly start coding with fresh, ephemeral and fully-compiled dev environments - no matter if you are building a new feature, want to fix a bug or do a code review.

There’s a SaaS offering that’s free for open source or you can self-host it if you prefer.

Fully-baked, collaborative development environments in your browser

Michael Terhar brownfield.dev

Building real applications from my iPad

Michel Terhar:

In the search for a comfy and portable developer experience, I’ve made a lot of compromises in the past. The experience has gotten significantly better recently thanks to VS Code and Kubernetes. This workflow also does a good job for underpowered laptops or when working with lots of different and conflicting versions of python or ruby.

This is a solid, balanced piece that doesn’t overly sell the workflow and walks you through setting it up for yourself.

VS Code github.com

VSCodium — VS Code sans Microsoft branding/telemetry/licensing

According to the “why does this exist” section of the readme:

Microsoft’s downloads of Visual Studio Code are licensed under this not-FLOSS license and contain telemetry/tracking. According to this comment from a Visual Studio Code maintainer:

When we [Microsoft] build Visual Studio Code, we do exactly this. We clone the vscode repository, we lay down a customized product.json that has Microsoft specific functionality (telemetry, gallery, logo, etc.), and then produce a build that we release under our license.

When you clone and build from the vscode repo, none of these endpoints are configured in the default product.json. Therefore, you generate a “clean” build, without the Microsoft customizations, which is by default licensed under the MIT license.

This repo exists so that you don’t have to download+build from source. The build scripts in this repo clone Microsoft’s vscode repo, run the build commands, and upload the resulting binaries to GitHub releases. These binaries are licensed under the MIT license. Telemetry is disabled.

The Visual Studio Code license referenced is a short read. You should read it if you use VS Code.

Atom discuss.atom.io

Is GitHub Codespaces a death knell for the Atom Editor?

May 7th, 2020: A discussion appears on Atom’s forum…

I use Atom for a few years now and was worried back then about the acquisition of Github from Microsoft. And now I read about Github Codespaces, which is powered by Visual Studio Code.

I’m a little concerned about this. Do you still support Atom? And do you support Atom in the future? If there are other opportunities of embedding a Editor or innovating would you also choose VS Code over Atom?

What is the future of Atom? Will you slowly move to VS Code and Atom will be on the support line?

All good questions. There’s been no official (or unofficial, that I’ve seen) response from GitHub just yet.

We’ve been following Atom for years now. Many great developers have put their efforts into the editor. But it’s hard to withstand the gravitational pull of VS Code. Even more so now that Microsoft owns GitHub? 🤔

Jonathan Carter github.com

GistPad for VS Code 📘

GistPad is a Visual Studio Code extension that allows you to manage GitHub Gists entirely within the editor. You can open, create, delete, fork, star and clone gists, and then seamlessly begin editing files as if they were local.

The big idea here is to use gists to seamlessly create your “very own developer library”. The interactive playgrounds is pretty cool, too.

GistPad for VS Code 📘

Go Time Go Time #106

Code editors and language servers

In this episode we talk with Ramya Rao about code editors and language servers. We share our thoughts on which editor we use, why we use it, and why we’d switch. We also discuss what a language server is and why it matters in connecting editors and the languages they support. We also dive into various ways to be effective with VS Code including shortcuts, plugins, and more.

VS Code github.com

Run VS Code on any server over SSH

sshcode is a CLI to automatically install and run code-server over SSH. It uploads your extensions and settings automatically, so you can seamlessly use remote servers as VS Code hosts.

If you have Chrome installed, it opens the browser in app mode. That means there’s no keybind conflicts, address bar, or indication that you’re coding within a browser. It feels just like native VS Code.

Run VS Code on any server over SSH

Paige Niedringhaus itnext.io

Sync your VS Code config anywhere with Settings Sync

No one likes to spend the day setting up and recreating the config of their text editor of choice. If you use VS Code and Settings Sync you won’t have to. Paige Niedringhaus writes:

This article will show you how to perfectly recreate your Visual Studio Code IDE settings without starting over from scratch and spending hours on it.

When faced with the possibility of losing (or even trying to transfer) my carefully developed VS Code setup to another machine, I knew there had to be a way to do it gracefully. I just knew the solution had to be out there, and so, I asked the internets, and it brought back Settings Sync.

Jonathan Carter DEV.to

In pursuit of enjoyable developer collaboration

Jonathan Carter, in a deep-dive on the why (and how) behind Live Share:

When we set out to build Visual Studio Live Share, we learned that teams collaborate in very diverse ways, with unique and meaningful perspectives about how it works most effectively for them (e.g. frequency of collaboration, session duration, whether it happens ad-hoc vs. scheduled).

Interesting insights, excellent collaboration feature. 👌

In pursuit of enjoyable developer collaboration

Kyle Carberry Medium

Run VS Code as a cloud-IDE on your own server

If you’ve been wanting a way to run VS Code as a cloud-IDE, code-server is what you’ve been looking for.

Code-server allows VS Code to run on a remote server making it fully accessible through the browser. … Developers ready to embrace the cloud-based IDE can do so without losing features, or control. This means you can code on your Chromebook, tablet and desktop with a completely synchronized environment. You can spill coffee on your laptop without fear of losing work.

Run VS Code as a cloud-IDE on your own server

Kenneth Reitz kennethreitz.org

Reasons to use VS Code for Python development

Kenneth Reitz, well known in the Python community, creator of Requests, and a former Changelogger has been using VS Code for Python development for several months and is giving it the “should use” status.

Kenneth writes on his personal blog:

I’ve been using Visual Studio Code daily now (for Python development) for about six months — long enough to give it a thorough review. Before, I was using Sublime Text with a few plugins, which worked very well— but, I am continually shocked at just how good VS Code is, in comparison, and I’d like to share with you my observations / opinions

Ives van Hoorne Twitter

"I got Visual Studio Code working in the browser!"

Ives van Hoorne, creator of CodeSandbox, tweeted this and the attached video has already racked up more than 41.5K views!

… This is not only Monaco, this is VSCode itself directly running in the browser with node shims connected to the APIs of CodeSandbox. This means that we can get Grid View, VSCode Extension support, breadcrumbs + more! I’m so excited by this! #

I’m close to getting VSCode extensions working in their own web worker, then we’ll get things like VIM mode, first class TypeScript support and more! The great thing is that it will work exactly as VSCode, it’s literally the same code base. #

"I got Visual Studio Code working in the browser!"
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