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WordPress

WordPress is a popular content management system, used for websites and blogs.
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Austin Gil austingil.com

WordPress is still pretty darn great

Austin Gil:

For building applications, I like to use a “modern” tech stack (Vue.js, Express.js, Node, PostgreSQL). Sexy, new technology is fun to work with and makes me feel smart. However, I see a lot of folks in the dev community speak poorly about WordPress, and I just don’t get it.

He goes on to explain why he continues to use WordPress, things he doesn’t love about it, and provides a few tips for using WordPress effectively.

WordPress github.com

Quickly provision a fully functional WordPress site with SQLite

helps you to quickly provision WordPress with SQLite and serve the site using PHP’s builtin webserver. No external WebServer like Apache or Nginx and Database Server like MySQL or MariaDB is required. WPSQLite can give you a completely portable installation of WordPress which you can install even in your pendrive and run on *nix based operating systems, or even on Windows.

This looks like a great option for getting a WP dev environment bootstrapped without much hassle. I didn’t even know you could run WordPress on SQLite…

Hashim Warren gatsbyjs.com

Why Gatsby chose headless WordPress for their blog

From the Gatsby blog on their choice to use headless WordPress for their blog:

The Gatsby blog has content from 133 authors. We’ve published articles from our community, technology partners, and staff members. WordPress enables us to have unlimited users (without paying a subscription per seat). WordPress also comes with powerful role-based permissions and has free plugins from services like Auth0 to unlock flexible security and authentication options. Those features made WordPress a perfect fit for our particular use case.

The Register Icon The Register

WordPress's Matt debates Netlify's Matt

If you missed this exchange between WordPress founder Matt Mullenweg and Netlify CEO Matt Biilmann at the recent Jamstack Conf, read this to get the tldr. Here’s a section of the conversation to focus on…

Public debate kicked off at the end of August, with Mullenweg telling reporter Richard MacManus: “Jamstack is a regression for the vast majority of the people adopting it…”

“I don’t think the era of WordPress is over,” Mullenweg added. “I think we’re going to reach over 50 per cent market share in the next few years.”

This is not so much to do with architecture, but rather because users love software-as-a-service, whereas Jamstack is about custom development. There is not yet a Jamstack equivalent to the likes of Shopify, Squarespace or Wix, all mentioned as growing businesses.

WordPress and Jamstack are not completely in opposition. “I still think WordPress can play a really important role in the future ecosystem,” said Biilmann. The pattern he said he sees is WordPress used as a headless service, with developers “completely being in control of the front end layer.”

Sarah Drasner Smashing Magazine

Migrating from WordPress To JAMStack

WordPress is MASSIVE — so why would a site using WordPress consider moving to JAMstack? This technical case study from Sarah Drasner covers how Smashing Magazine manages their content and what an actual WordPress migration looks like (using Smashing Magazine).

In this two-part article series, we’ll cover what an actual WordPress migration looks like, using a case study of the very site you’re reading from right now.

We’ll talk through the gains and losses, the things we wish we knew earlier, and what we were surprised by. And then we’ll follow it up with a technical demonstration of one possible migration path, not off WordPress completely, but how you can serve decoupled WordPress so that you can have the best of both worlds: a JAMstack implementation of WordPress that gives you all the power of their dashboard and functionality, with better performance and security.

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