Feross Aboukhadijeh wormhole.app

Wormhole – Simple, fast, private file sharing ✨

Wormhole lets you share files with end-to-end encryption and a link that automatically expires. So you can keep what you share private and make sure your stuff doesn’t stay online forever.


Our #1 goal is speed – you should be able to get a share link in less than 2 seconds with the absolute minimum number of clicks.

That’s why Wormhole supports instant file streaming. There’s no need to wait for your files to finish uploading before you can copy the link and send it to your recipient. The recipient can start downloading even before the files have finished uploading.

Wormhole uses super fast peer-to-peer transfer to send files directly to the recipient when possible. This improves speed and security – especially when transferring files over a local network, like when you just want to get a file from your phone onto your computer.

In addition, Wormhole stores your encrypted files on cloud servers for 24 hours so the share link will keep working for your recipient even after you close the Wormhole site.

Practical AI Practical AI #132

Generating "hunches" using smart home data 🏠

Smart home data is complicated. There are all kinds of devices, and they are in many different combinations, geographies, configurations, etc. This complicated data situation is further exacerbated during a pandemic when time series data seems to be filled with anomalies. Evan Welbourne joins us to discuss how Amazon is synthesizing this disparate data into functionality for the next generation of smart homes. He discusses the challenges of working with smart home technology, and he describes how they developed their latest feature called “hunches.”

Awesome Lists github.com

A collection of services with great free tiers for developers on a budget

This repository offers a collection of services with great free tiers for developers on a budget. Because not everyone has 20$ per month to spend on app or database hosting for every single side-project.

Nowadays, a lot of services are offering really good free tier more than enough for testing small apps and even put them in production. They are just waiting to be used by you.

I got a kick out of their FTDD acronym: Free Tier Driven Development

Rails weblog.rubyonrails.org

Clarity on Rails' governance

In the wake of recent events at Basecamp (and DHH’s continued involvement with Ruby on Rails), many have questioned the governance process for Rails. This post from “The Rails Team” is meant to “clarify how the team is structured,” and how they operate.

…no one on the Core team, or their employers, have sole control over the framework or community. There is no individual or subset of individuals who have power to enact policies unilaterally in the Rails community spaces that we operate (for example on issues, pull requests, or the forum).

Teleport Icon Teleport – Sponsored

Setting up an SSH jump server

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An SSH jump server is a regular Linux server, accessible from the Internet, which is used as a gateway to access other Linux machines on a private network using the SSH protocol. The purpose of an SSH jump server is to be the only gateway for access to your infrastructure reducing the size of any potential attack surface.

In this blog post we’ll cover how to set up an SSH jump server. We’ll cover two open source projects.

  1. A traditional SSH jump server using OpenSSH. The advantage of this method is that your servers already have OpenSSH pre-installed.
  2. A modern approach using Teleport, a newer open source alternative to OpenSSH.

Both of these servers are easy to install and configure, are free and open source, and are single-binary Linux daemons.

The New Stack Icon The New Stack

Remembering Dan Kaminsky

David Cassel, on The New Stack:

Widely-respected security expert Dan Kaminsky passed away on April 23 from diabetic ketoacidosis at the age of 42. His considerable legacy went beyond expertise with a rare and memorable kindness.

I met Dan very briefly at ShmooCon back in 2004. His kindness was memorable, for sure, but the thing I remember most was just how larger-than-life he was to me at the time. The guy contributed so much to the infosec community and yet remained humble and kind despite it all. It was striking.

By the age of 22, he was giving talks at Black Hat himself, as well as at other tech conferences around the world. Kaminsky told the site he was thrilled to be interacting “with the smartest people I’d ever met in my life.”

Oddly enough, that’s how I felt when I interacted with Dan. It’s a tragedy that he died so young.

Remembering Dan Kaminsky

RSS github.com

A web-based RSS reader running entirely from your GitHub repo

The feed is hosted on GitHub Pages (which means it’s public to all) and is static until it gets rebuilt. Building is done periodically via a GitHub Action; configuration is via a YAML file (It’d be cooler if you could import an OPML instead). Even if it’s not something you’d use, I think this project is interesting for two reasons:

  1. It’s part of a “GitHub as Stack” meta-trend
  2. It promotes RSS, which is one of the web’s great treasures

SQLite unixsheikh.com

SQLite is the only database you will ever need in most cases

SQLite is so hot right now.

Even if you start out small and later need to upscale, as long as your web application can run on the same machine as the database, which it can in 99% of the time, you can just upgrade the hardware to a beefier machine and keep business as usual.

The only time you need to consider a client-server setup is…

AI (Artificial Intelligence) exxactcorp.com

Disentangling AI, machine learning, and deep learning

This article starts with a concise description of the relationship and differences of these 3 commonly used industry terms. Then it digs into the history.

Deep learning is a subset of machine learning, which in turn is a subset of artificial intelligence, but the origins of these names arose from an interesting history. In addition, there are fascinating technical characteristics that can differentiate deep learning from other types of machine learning…essential working knowledge for anyone with ML, DL, or AI in their skillset.

Disentangling AI, machine learning, and deep learning

Stack Overflow stackoverflow.blog

How often do people actually copy/paste from Stack Overflow? Now we know

April Fool’s may be over, but once we set up a system to react every time someone typed Command+C, we realized there was also an opportunity to learn about how people use our site. Here’s what we found.

TLDR; one in four users copy something within five minutes of hitting a page. But this blog post (and accompanying podcast episode) goes deep into the details and lays it all out for you with pretty charts.

Casey Newton platformer.news

What really happened at Basecamp

Casey Newton interviewed a half-dozen Basecamp employees, as well as David Heinemeier Hansson (Basecamp co-founder) to write this account of recent events.

How a list of “funny” customer names triggered an internal reckoning. The controversy that embroiled enterprise software maker Basecamp this week began more than a decade ago, with a simple list of customers. Around 2009, Basecamp customer service representatives began keeping a list of names that they found funny. More than a decade later, current employees were so mortified by the practice that none of them would give me a single example of a name on the list.

Discussion about the list and how the company ought to hold itself accountable for creating it led directly to CEO Jason Fried announcing Tuesday that Basecamp would ban employees from holding “societal and political discussions” on the company’s internal chat forums. The move, which has sparked widespread discussion in Silicon Valley, follows a similar move from cryptocurrency company Coinbase last year.

Employees say the founders’ memos unfairly depicted their workplace as being riven by partisan politics, when in fact the main source of the discussion had always been Basecamp itself.

Seriously loving the writing coming from Casey on Platformer since his departure from The Verge.

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