Ship It! Ship It! #1

Introducing Ship It!

Welcome to Ship It! This is a new show from Changelog about shipping software - and all the details, challenges, and problems that surface. Changelog SRE Gerhard Lazu is taking us on a journey into the world of shipping code, infrastructure, ops, and the people making it happen.

Shipping is near and dear to every developers’ heart. We do it every day. It’s the essential first step. You have to ship it to share your ideas with the world. New episodes ship weekly.

Docker github.com

The easiest way to install & manage WireGuard on any Linux host

WireGuard Easy uses Docker to set up WireGuard VPN along with a web UI for easy management. While this may be the easiest way to get up and running, I’d still advise checking out Algo VPN as well since it’s also pretty easy and has been designed/configured with maximum security in mind. Still, this looks cool and the web admin UI makes it quite approachable as well.

The easiest way to install & manage WireGuard on any Linux host

LaunchDarkly Icon LaunchDarkly – Sponsored

Building better software with the scientific method

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As humans, we are constantly faced with problems. We build software to solve problems. The features we create sometimes have problems when we deploy. We encounter an obstacle and need to figure out how to overcome it. We don’t necessarily know how to solve the problem at the outset, but how we think about the problem and the solution will impact whether we are successful or not.

I remember learning about the scientific method many years ago. Watching the Neil DeGrasse Tyson Masterclass, I started thinking about how the scientific method applies to delivering and supporting software. One quote jumped out at me: “The most important moments of your life are not decided by what you know, but how you think.” It’s not about what we know about delivering and deploying software, but how we think about the processes we use to do so.

How do you approach a software problem? Imagine you’re trying to compile newly written code and encounter an error. You don’t immediately know what is wrong; we need to investigate the issue. How do you approach the problem?

Start your 14-Day trial today

Command line interface github.com

rpg-cli —your filesystem as a dungeon!

rpg-cli is a bare-bones JRPG-inspired terminal game written in Rust. It can work as an alternative to cd where you randomly encounter enemies as you change directories.

You’ll want to practice a bit first, then once you get good at it go ahead and override the builtin cd by adding this function to your bash profile.

cd () {
   rpg-cli "$@"
   builtin cd "$(rpg-cli --pwd)"
}
rpg-cli —your filesystem as a dungeon!

Practical AI Practical AI #135

Elixir meets machine learning

Today we’re sharing a special crossover episode from The Changelog podcast here on Practical AI. Recently, Daniel Whitenack joined Jerod Santo to talk with José Valim, Elixir creator, about Numerical Elixir. This is José’s newest project that’s bringing Elixir into the world of machine learning. They discuss why José chose this as his next direction, the team’s layered approach, influences and collaborators on this effort, and their awesome collaborative notebook that’s built on Phoenix LiveView.

Tom MacWright macwright.com

The return of fancy tools

Tom MacWright on the pendulum swinging back and forth between simple and “fancy”

Technology is seeing a little return to complexity. Dreamweaver gave way to hand-coding websites, which is now leading into Webflow, which is a lot like Dreamweaver. Evernote give way to minimal Markdown notes, which are now becoming Notion, Coda, or Craft. Visual Studio was “disrupted” by Sublime Text and TextMate, which are now getting replaced by Visual Studio Code. JIRA was replaced by GitHub issues, which is getting outmoded by Linear.

The Changelog The Changelog #441

Inside 2021's infrastructure for Changelog.com

This week we’re talking about the latest infrastructure updates we’ve made for 2021. We’re joined by Gerhard Lazu, our resident SRE here at Changelog, talking about the improvements we’ve made to 10x our speed and be 100% available. We also mention the new podcast we’ve launched, hosted by Gerhard. Stick around the last half of the show for more details.

Kubernetes github.com

Porter is a Kubernetes-powered PaaS that runs in your own cloud provider

Porter brings the Heroku experience to your own AWS/GCP account, while upgrading your infrastructure to Kubernetes. Get started on Porter without the overhead of DevOps and customize your infrastructure later when you need to.

For more on Porter, tune in to Go Time live on June 1st! Mat Ryer will be asking Carolyn Van Slyck all about it. If live isn’t an option… subscribe to Go Time, why don’t ya?

Namespace conflict! I mistook this Porter for that Porter which Carolyn Van Slyck works on. That Porter will be the subject of the June 1st Go Time, not this Porter. If you want us to do a show on this Porter, let us know. 😎

JavaScript v2.parceljs.org

Parcel 2 is getting a 10x compiler speedup (thanks, Rust!)

The Parcel team is excited to release Parcel 2 beta 3! This release includes a ground up rewrite of our JavaScript compiler in Rust, which improves overall build performance by up to 10x. In addition, this post will cover some other improvements we’ve made to Parcel since our last update, along with our roadmap to a stable Parcel 2 release.

A growing trend in the JS tooling world is to replace bits and pieces with Rust || Go where it makes sense and reap the performance benefits. Congrats to the Parcel team on epic results from this rewriting effort.

Parcel 2 is getting a 10x compiler speedup (thanks, Rust!)

Go Time Go Time #180

Are frameworks getting an Encore?

Tools and frameworks that aim to boost developer productivity are always worth a closer look, but we don’t often consider the trade-offs for whichever we settle on. In this episode, we discuss the questions one should be asking when evaluating developer productivity tools and frameworks in the Go ecosystem in particular.

Joining us to discuss is André Eriksson, the creator of Encore, a backend framework that aims to make development and deployment as productive as it can be.

Cloudflare Icon Cloudflare

Humanity wastes about 500 years per day on CAPTCHAs. It’s time to end this madness

Thibault Meunir writing on Cloudflare’s blog:

Based on our data, it takes a user on average 32 seconds to complete a CAPTCHA challenge. There are 4.6 billion global Internet users. We assume a typical Internet user sees approximately one CAPTCHA every 10 days.

This very simple back of the envelope math equates to somewhere in the order of 500 human years wasted every single day — just for us to prove our humanity.

They aren’t just doing napkin math, they’re also trying to fix things:

We want to get rid of CAPTCHAs completely. The idea is rather simple: a real human should be able to touch or look at their device to prove they are human, without revealing their identity. We want you to be able to prove that you are human without revealing which human you are! You may ask if this is even possible? And the answer is: Yes!

I held off on having a CAPTCHA on our site for as long as I could, but the spammers are relentless (did you know they’ll even click on email confirmations now?!) so I finally gave in.

I’d do darn near anything to be rid of ‘em again (any ideas?), but it seems the alternative that Cloudflare is pursuing requires hardware security keys. Interesting stuff, and definitely worth a read, but it’s all experimental for now and I don’t know if/when we’ll be able to put it in practice.

TechCrunch Icon TechCrunch

Google revives RSS

Paul Bakaus teased this on JS Party #174, but the announcement landed even sooner than he said it would:

Chrome, at least in its experimental Canary version on Android (and only for users in the U.S.), is getting an interesting update in the coming weeks that brings back RSS, the once-popular format for getting updates from all the sites you love in Google Reader and similar services.

In Chrome, users will soon see a “Follow” feature for sites that support RSS and the browser’s New Tab page will get what is essentially a (very) basic RSS reader — I guess you could almost call it a “Google Reader.”

I sure do hope this is a small step on a longer journey to bring RSS (back) to the masses. It really is one of the web’s most virtuous technologies. Let’s not get too excited, though:

For now, though, this is only an experiment. Google says it wants to gather feedback from “publishers, bloggers, creators, and citizens of the open web” as it aims to build “deeper engagement between users and web publishers in Chrome.” Hopefully, it won’t stay this way.

My only question is: where can we spam submit this feedback that they’re after?!

Linux github.com

Lima is like a "macOS subsystem for Linux"

Lima launches Linux VMs on your Intel or ARM-based Mac with automatic file sharing, port forwarding, and containerd. That means you can easily do cool stuff like:

$ echo "files under /Users on macOS filesystem are readable from Linux" > some-file

$ lima cat some-file
files under /Users on macOS filesystem are readable from Linux

$ lima sh -c 'echo "/tmp/lima is writable from both macOS and Linux" > /tmp/lima/another-file'

$ cat /tmp/lima/another-file
/tmp/lima is writable from both macOS and Linux"

Ethereum blog.ethereum.org

Ethereum will use at least ~99.95% less energy post merge

Bitcoin’s Proof of work (PoW) consensus mechanism is hotly debated these days due it its energy consumption. Proof of stake (PoS) is a different way to skin the consensus cat.

While it’s less proven to work in the real world (Bitcoin’s uptime and security over the network’s 12-year lifespan is perhaps its greatest asset), PoS is quite promising and we’re starting to see the fruit of that promise with early numbers from Ethereum 2.

Ethereum will be completing the transition to Proof-of-Stake in the upcoming months, which brings a myriad of improvements that have been theorized for years. But now that the Beacon chain has been running for a few months, we can actually dig into the numbers. One area that we’re excited to explore involves new energy-use estimates, as we end the process of expending a country’s worth of energy on consensus.

Ethereum will use at least ~99.95% less energy post merge

Patrick DeVivo github.com

Reqlite lets you query Redis with SQL

Patrick DeVivo:

This is a project in Go that compiles to a SQLite runtime loadable extension, which brings Redis commands into a SQL context. This allows you to write SQL queries against data in a Redis instance, using Redis commands like LRANGE as SQL functions.

Experimental for now. But why? Patrick says:

In general, Redis is fairly accessible from many programming languages, and any query using reqlite could probably be implemented in a language of your choice using a Redis client. However, sometimes declarative SQL can be a better choice to express what you’re looking for, and that’s where this project may be most useful.

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