Teleport Icon Teleport – Sponsored

Securing your PostgreSQL database

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Databases are the Holy Grail for hackers, and as such, must be protected with utmost care. This is the first in a series of articles from Teleport where they give an overview of best practices for securing databases.

They’re starting with one of the most popular open-source databases, PostgreSQL, and will go over several levels of security you’d need to think about:

  • Network-level security
  • Transport-level security
  • Database-level security

Craig Kerstiens blog.crunchydata.com

Better JSON in Postgres with PostgreSQL 14

Craig Kerstiens:

Postgres has had “JSON” support for nearly 10 years now. I put JSON in quotes because well, 10 years ago when we announced JSON support we kinda cheated. We validated JSON was valid and then put it into a standard text field. Two years later in 2014 with Postgres 9.4 we got more proper JSON support with the JSONB datatype. My colleague @will likes to state that the B stands for better. In Postgres 14, the JSONB support is indeed getting way better.

A small but solid improvement to how you query JSONB, making it more JSON-y than ever.

Awesome Lists github.com

Awesome online talks and screencasts

There are a lot of screencasts, recordings of user group gatherings and conference talks available online. I try to commit myself watching at least two new talks every week, and I’ve been doing this for quite some time now. I created this list of online talks that I really enjoyed watching. I’ll also be updating this list whenever I’ve watched another awesome talk that is worthy enough. Suggestions are always appreciated through a pull request.

CSS daisyui.com

DaisyUI – component classes for Tailwind

When we had Adam Wathan on JS Party, I asked him if anybody besides the Tailwind team were working on component libraries. He said yes, but didn’t name any off the top of his head. Well, add DaisyUI to the list.

Your HTML doesn’t need to be messy. DaisyUI adds component classes to Tailwind CSS. Classes like btn, card, etc… No need to deal with hundreds of utility classes.

No script dependencies. 2KB gzipped. Worth a look.

Cockroach Labs Icon Cockroach Labs – Sponsored

Running CockroachDB on Kubernetes

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How does CockroachDB fit in a cloud-native Kubernetes world?

Managing resilience, scale, and ease of operations in a containerized world is largely what Kubernetes is all about—and one of the reasons platform adoption has doubled since 2017. And as container orchestration continues to become a dominant DevOps paradigm, the ecosystem has continued to mature with better tools for replication, management, and monitoring of our workloads.

And as Kubernetes grows, so does CockroachDB as we’ve recently simplified some of the day 2 operations associated with our distributed database with our Kubernetes Operator. Ultimately, however, our overall goal in the cloud-native community is singular: ease the deployment of stateful workloads on Kubernetes.

Linux github.com

Lima is like a "macOS subsystem for Linux"

Lima launches Linux VMs on your Intel or ARM-based Mac with automatic file sharing, port forwarding, and containerd. That means you can easily do cool stuff like:

$ echo "files under /Users on macOS filesystem are readable from Linux" > some-file

$ lima cat some-file
files under /Users on macOS filesystem are readable from Linux

$ lima sh -c 'echo "/tmp/lima is writable from both macOS and Linux" > /tmp/lima/another-file'

$ cat /tmp/lima/another-file
/tmp/lima is writable from both macOS and Linux"

Tom MacWright macwright.com

The return of fancy tools

Tom MacWright on the pendulum swinging back and forth between simple and “fancy”

Technology is seeing a little return to complexity. Dreamweaver gave way to hand-coding websites, which is now leading into Webflow, which is a lot like Dreamweaver. Evernote give way to minimal Markdown notes, which are now becoming Notion, Coda, or Craft. Visual Studio was “disrupted” by Sublime Text and TextMate, which are now getting replaced by Visual Studio Code. JIRA was replaced by GitHub issues, which is getting outmoded by Linear.

Kubernetes github.com

Porter is a Kubernetes-powered PaaS that runs in your own cloud provider

Porter brings the Heroku experience to your own AWS/GCP account, while upgrading your infrastructure to Kubernetes. Get started on Porter without the overhead of DevOps and customize your infrastructure later when you need to.

For more on Porter, tune in to Go Time live on June 1st! Mat Ryer will be asking Carolyn Van Slyck all about it. If live isn’t an option… subscribe to Go Time, why don’t ya?

Namespace conflict! I mistook this Porter for that Porter which Carolyn Van Slyck works on. That Porter will be the subject of the June 1st Go Time, not this Porter. If you want us to do a show on this Porter, let us know. 😎

Richard Hipp sqlite.org

Richard Hipp's single file webserver written in C

Althttpd is a simple webserver that has run the sqlite.org website since 2004. Althttpd strives for simplicity, security, and low resource usage.

As of 2018, the althttpd instance for sqlite.org answers about 500,000 HTTP requests per day (about 5 or 6 per second) delivering about 50GB of content per day (about 4.6 megabits/second) on a $40/month Linode. The load average on this machine normally stays around 0.1 or 0.2. About 19% of the HTTP requests are CGI to various Fossil source-code repositories.

Richard has a knack for creating simple, high quality tools. When we did our (now legendary) show with him back in 2016, he was quite keen on coming back at some point to discuss Fossil. Should we make that happen?

JavaScript v2.parceljs.org

Parcel 2 is getting a 10x compiler speedup (thanks, Rust!)

The Parcel team is excited to release Parcel 2 beta 3! This release includes a ground up rewrite of our JavaScript compiler in Rust, which improves overall build performance by up to 10x. In addition, this post will cover some other improvements we’ve made to Parcel since our last update, along with our roadmap to a stable Parcel 2 release.

A growing trend in the JS tooling world is to replace bits and pieces with Rust || Go where it makes sense and reap the performance benefits. Congrats to the Parcel team on epic results from this rewriting effort.

Parcel 2 is getting a 10x compiler speedup (thanks, Rust!)
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