CSS daisyui.com

DaisyUI – component classes for Tailwind

When we had Adam Wathan on JS Party, I asked him if anybody besides the Tailwind team were working on component libraries. He said yes, but didn’t name any off the top of his head. Well, add DaisyUI to the list.

Your HTML doesn’t need to be messy. DaisyUI adds component classes to Tailwind CSS. Classes like btn, card, etc… No need to deal with hundreds of utility classes.

No script dependencies. 2KB gzipped. Worth a look.

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"The Ethereum community has accidentally solved a major problem of the Internet: Single Sign-On"

This bold statement starts a long Twitter thread by Brantly Millegan:

“Sign-In w/ Ethereum” is the future of login for every app on the Internet, crypto-related or not. Not just an idea, it’s already the norm for web3 & will spread.

This idea was the most interesting/exciting thing for me that came out of our NFT talk with Mikeal Rogers. Could cryptocurrency be the carrot that attracts the masses to obtain a public/private key pair and be financially incentivized to secure it? If so, this makes for a far superior global identity system to anything previous.

For this to happen, I think mainstream browsers will have to build crypto wallets into them. Plugins and extensions like MetaMask are probably asking too much of people. What do you think? Feasible? Likely? Why or why not?

Petr Stribny stribny.name

Scaling relational SQL databases

When it comes to scaling, we might need to think about:

  • data storage, if we store more and more data and it becomes expensive or slow working with them
  • fast INSERTs and UPDATES for write-heavy workloads
  • making SELECT queries faster because of their complexity or because they need to query huge amounts of data
  • concurrency if we have many clients interacting with the database

In this article, I will present some basic ideas and starting points on scaling traditional SQL databases.

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Building better software with the scientific method

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As humans, we are constantly faced with problems. We build software to solve problems. The features we create sometimes have problems when we deploy. We encounter an obstacle and need to figure out how to overcome it. We don’t necessarily know how to solve the problem at the outset, but how we think about the problem and the solution will impact whether we are successful or not.

I remember learning about the scientific method many years ago. Watching the Neil DeGrasse Tyson Masterclass, I started thinking about how the scientific method applies to delivering and supporting software. One quote jumped out at me: “The most important moments of your life are not decided by what you know, but how you think.” It’s not about what we know about delivering and deploying software, but how we think about the processes we use to do so.

How do you approach a software problem? Imagine you’re trying to compile newly written code and encounter an error. You don’t immediately know what is wrong; we need to investigate the issue. How do you approach the problem?

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Lj Miranda ljvmiranda921.github.io

What can "Avengers: Endgame" teach us about Git?

LJ Miranda:

When I first saw “Avengers: Endgame” in theaters, I noticed that their time travel rule is quite similar to the Git branching model. Referred to as the time heist, our heroes travelled through time to recover the stones…

I had to truncate that pull quote to avoid Avengers spoilers. If you’ve seen the movie (or don’t care about getting spoiled) there’s some good Git knowledge to be gained from this analogy.

iOS github.com

Recreating a fully functional version of iOS 4 in SwiftUI

OldOS is a testament to the days of yesteryear, showcasing what iOS once was ten years ago. The ethos of the app is to merge the technologies of today with a pixel-perfect recreation of the user experience of the past. The vast majority of apps in OldOS are fully functional — meaning they seamlessly integrate with the data on your phone to deliver a live, emulator-esque experience. What does this mean? Well, you can play your music in iPod, get directions in Maps, surf the web in Safari, view the current weather in Weather, and much more.

This is quite the undertaking!

Part of the goal with OldOS is to enable anyone to understand how iOS works and demonstrate just how powerful SwiftUI truly is. For that reason, the entire app will soon be open-sourced — enabling developers to learn about, modify, and add to the app. I thought building this over my last six or so months in high school and sharing it with the world would be a fun and productive endeavor.

It looks like there’s a build available today, but it’s not open source yet so I’m going out on a limb by linking it up now. I’ve +1’d a request for screenshots, which would be a great addition to the repo while we wait for code.

Recreating a fully functional version of iOS 4 in SwiftUI

Miroslav Nikolov webup.org

Arguments for a project kickoff strategy

Miroslav Nikolov:

You may not be a project manager. Perhaps you are a developer who likes to code and solve technical challenges. The organizational matter is something you care less about. After all, your company is likely relying on some agile methods and there are product owners and/or SCRUM masters to handle the process. You just need to build new features.

While that’s true you have to sometimes get out of your comfort zone.

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Setting up an SSH jump server

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An SSH jump server is a regular Linux server, accessible from the Internet, which is used as a gateway to access other Linux machines on a private network using the SSH protocol. The purpose of an SSH jump server is to be the only gateway for access to your infrastructure reducing the size of any potential attack surface.

In this blog post we’ll cover how to set up an SSH jump server. We’ll cover two open source projects.

  1. A traditional SSH jump server using OpenSSH. The advantage of this method is that your servers already have OpenSSH pre-installed.
  2. A modern approach using Teleport, a newer open source alternative to OpenSSH.

Both of these servers are easy to install and configure, are free and open source, and are single-binary Linux daemons.

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How I teach Python on the Raspberry Pi 400 at the public library

Don Watkins:

Mark Van Doren said, “the art of teaching is the art of assisting discovery.” I saw that play out in this classroom using open source tools. More students need opportunities like this to help them gain a quality education. The Raspberry Pi 400 is a great form factor for teaching and learning.

Such a cool program that’d be easy to reproduce in your local library.

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