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Jonas Lundberg

Jonas Lundberg iamjonas.me

The test-plan

The tests are timing out again!”, someone yells. “Alright I’ll bump them”, you instinctively respond. Then you pause and feel uneasy. Is there another way?

In this blog post, I share my growing disconnect with code-coverage and unit-testing. I then detail the method I’ve been using for the greater part of 7 years and how it still allows me to preach at length that being correct is the single most important thing for a developer.

Jonas Lundberg iamjonas.me

We need to talk about your commit messges

Jonas Lundberg:

We all do it. Up to many times a day and yet it’s rare that I meet someone that has given it a second thought. No, it’s not secretly snacking chocolate from your top office drawer.

It’s how you write and structure your commits. Possibly while snacking chocolate.

What follows is a piece marrying atomic commits (as in small commits with one focus) with Donald Knuth’s literate programming. It ends with some research on whether or not this practice commonplace on the 100 most popular GitHub repos.

Jonas Lundberg iamjonas.me

Have a feedback loop

Jonas Lundberg:

In order to know that you are progressing you need some yardstick to measure against. The most common case is someone better and more experienced (having done the trip to mastery themselves) telling or showing you what you need to improve or if you are doing great. But what if there are no coaches or obvious roads to mastery?

From there Jonas goes on a deep-dive on why feedback loops are important and how you can acquire them for yourself. Oh, and if you need a feedback loop (and perhaps some cheer leading) on your writing, join the #blogging channel in our Community Slack. We have a small group forming.

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