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Frameworks

A framework is a reusable set of libraries or classes in software.
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Go Time Go Time #180

Are frameworks getting an Encore?

Tools and frameworks that aim to boost developer productivity are always worth a closer look, but we don’t often consider the trade-offs for whichever we settle on. In this episode, we discuss the questions one should be asking when evaluating developer productivity tools and frameworks in the Go ecosystem in particular.

Joining us to discuss is André Eriksson, the creator of Encore, a backend framework that aims to make development and deployment as productive as it can be.

Go github.com

A Go backend framework for rapidly creating APIs and distributed systems

Encore uses static analysis and code generation to reduce the boilerplate you have to write, resulting in an extremely productive developer experience.

The list of superpowers is impressive, to say the least. I know gophers tend to be skittish when they’re approached by a framework, though, so I’d love to hear more about this project on Go Time

Adam Wathan YouTube

The next generation of Tailwind CSS

Adam Wathan reveals Tailwind’s new JIT compiler:

One of the hardest constraints we’ve had to deal with as we’ve improved Tailwind CSS over the years is the generated file size in development. With enough customizations to your config file, the generated CSS can reach 10mb or more, and there’s only so much CSS that build tools and even the browser itself will comfortably tolerate.

Today I’m super excited to share a new project we’ve been working on that makes this constraint a thing of the past: a just-in-time compiler for Tailwind CSS.

Tom MacWright macwright.com

If not SPAs, what?

Tom MacWright shared some concerns for SPAs place in the modern web and followed it up with a post sharing suggestions to use instead.

The SPA pattern (Single-Page Apps), I tried to define, was about the React model, which also covers, to a large extent, the model of Vue, Angular, and other frontend frameworks.

Like any critique, it begs for a prescription and I didn’t give one, other than gesturing toward server-side frameworks like Rails and Django. But I think there are some trends starting to form. I had queued up some time to really dive into the frameworks, but things like walking in parks have taken priority, so here’s just a grand tour.

JavaScript hyperapp.dev

Hyperapp – the tiny framework for building web interfaces

Hyperapp claims to be twice as fast as React, weighs in at 1.8KB, and renders interactively in ~10ms.

Hyperapp is a modern VDOM engine, state management solution, and application design pattern all-in-one. once you learn to use it, there’ll be no end to what you can do.

Filed under: zero-minutes-since-last-frontend-framework

Tobias Uhlig github.com

A UI framework that runs (almost) entirely in Web Workers

Tobias Uhlig:

Neo is based on top of ES8 and uses the latest ES features as long as they can run directly inside the browser. This is one of the major design goals: the dev mode can run inside a browser without needing any JS related builds or transpilations. Instead of using any kind of templates, persistent JSON structures are in place. The combinations of these concepts lead to a pretty amazing performance and adds new possibilities for scaling to the UI area.

I haven’t seen any benchmarks or examples where using Neo produces extreme performance, but conceptually it makes sense that moving computationally expensive things to background threads would keep your UI thread snappy.

JavaScript timkadlec.com

The cost of JavaScript frameworks

We all know our users pay a cost when we push our JS framework in to their browser. Now, thanks to Tim Kadlec doing the yeoman’s work of crunching the numbers, we can approximate just how much that cost really is.

There is no faster (pun intended) way to slow down a site than to use a bunch of JavaScript. The thing about JavaScript is you end up paying a performance tax no less than four times:

  1. The cost of downloading the file on the network
  2. The cost of parsing and compiling the uncompressed file once downloaded
  3. The cost of executing the JavaScript
  4. The memory cost

Thanks to HTTP Archive, we can figure that out.

I’m pretty happy with how sites using jQuery size up. Granted, it’s not really a UI framework like the others are, but you have to imagine that many of those sites also use jQuery UI and their overall cost still compares well to the more modern solutions.

Brain Science Brain Science #16

Developing a mental framework

The quality of your thinking depends on your mental framework. To become a better thinker you need to have an understanding of this mental framework and how you view the world. But, what exactly is a mental framework? How have we all been programmed throughout our lives? In what ways have you been programed that you like, don’t like, or want to change? Join us as we explore and examine the key components of developing a mental framework.

Brandon Bayer github.com

Blitz.js — a Rails-like framework for full-stack React apps without an API

Brandon Bayer:

The central thesis is that most apps don’t need a REST or GraphQL API. Blitz brings back the simplicity of server rendered frameworks like Ruby on Rails while preserving everything we love about React.

Additionally, Blitz is bringing other Rails goodness that’s missing in the React ecosystem like file structure and routing conventions, a really nice console REPL, intelligent code-scaffolding, and a fine-tuned out-of-the-box setup with Prettier, Typescript, ESlint, Jest, Cypress, etc.

The framework ‘wars’ continue right alongside the monolith-vs-microservices debate. For more on the principles behind Blitz, check out the manifesto.

Go github.com

Fiber – an Express inspired web framework for gophers

I know the Go community isn’t one for frameworks, but as a long time framework user myself, I’ve never quite understood the resistance. Fiber doesn’t hide the ball. It comes right out and says “this is a web framework written in Go”. Here’s the philosophy behind that:

New gophers that make the switch from Node.js to Go are dealing with a learning curve before they can start building their web applications or microservices. Fiber, as a web framework, was created with the idea of minimalism and follow UNIX way, so that new gophers can quickly enter the world of Go with a warm and trusted welcome.

Fiber is inspired by Express, the most popular web framework on the Internet. We combined the ease of Express and raw performance of Go. If you have ever implemented a web application on Node.js (using Express or similar), then many methods and principles will seem very common to you.

Medium Icon Medium

I’ve spent 5 years writing a JavaScript framework on my own

Typescene is a robust front end library written in TypeScript: strongly typed, no dependencies, no nonsense. It’s really great for desktop-like (or mobile) applications, not so great for blogs and other content. It isn’t backed by some major corporation, not even a startup, but it’s been built by me: one developer on a mission to build a no-nonsense dependency-less framework

The author’s journey is noteworthy, but if you’re mostly wanting to know if this particular framework speaks to you, jump directly to its list of goals.

Google Icon Google

Flutter for web

Flutter for web is a code-compatible implementation of Flutter that is rendered using standards-based web technologies: HTML, CSS and JavaScript. With Flutter for web, you can compile existing Flutter code written in Dart into a client experience that can be embedded in the browser and deployed to any web server. You can use all the features of Flutter, and you don’t need a browser plug-in.

This means Flutter is now on mobile, web, desktop, and embedded systems. What surprises me is how dedicated to Dart Google seems to be, despite community malaise and the success of TypeScript.

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