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Windows github.com

WSLg brings Linux GUI apps to Windows in a fully integrated fashion

WSLg provides an integrated experience for developers, scientists or enthusiasts that prefer or need to run Windows on their PC but also need the ability to run tools or applications which works best, or exclusively, in a Linux environment. While users can accomplish this today using a multiple system setup, with individual PC dedicated to Windows and Linux, virtual machine hosting either Windows or Linux, or an XServer running on Windows and projected into WSL, WSLg provides a more integrated, user friendly and productive alternative.

WSLg strives to make Linux GUI applications feel native and natural to use on Windows. From integration into the Start Menu for launch to appearing in the task bar, alt-tab experience to enabling cut/paste across Windows and Linux applications, WSLg enables a seamless desktop experience and workflow leveraging Windows and Linux applications.

Microsoft’s engineers just keep crankin’ out the hits.

WSLg brings Linux GUI apps to Windows in a fully integrated fashion

Opensource.com Icon Opensource.com

Why I use `exa` instead of `ls` on Linux

We’ve linked to exa in the past, but this post may convince you to give it a try by detailing its many virtues.

I believe exa is one of the easiest, most adaptable tools. It helps me track a lot of Git and Maven files. Its color-coding makes it easier for me to search through multiple subdirectories, and it helps me to understand the current xattrs.

Opensource.com Icon Opensource.com

5 reasons why I love coding on Linux

Seth Kenlon:

It turns out that Linux is an excellent platform for programmers, both new and experienced. It’s not that you need Linux to program. There are successful developers on all different kinds of platforms. However, Linux has much to offer developers. Here are a few things I’ve found useful.

I switched from Linux to OS X macOS 15 years(ish) ago and I hadn’t looked back until the last year or two. It might be getting time to give Linux another shot. But which distro to choose?🤔

The Changelog The Changelog #427

The rise of Rocky Linux

This week we’re talking with Gregory Kurtzer about Rocky Linux. Greg is the founder of the CentOS project, which recently shifted its strategy and has the Linux community scrambling. Rocky Linux aims to continue where the CentOS project left off — to provide a free and open source community-driven enterprise grade Linux operating system. We discuss the history of the CentOS project, how it fell under Red Hat’s control, the recent shift in Red Hat’s strategy with CentOS, and how Rocky Linux is designed to be 100% bug-for-bug compatible with Red Hat Enterprise Linux.

Alex Ellis blog.alexellis.io

containerd development with Linux and multipass

About 18 months ago I started a project which had to develop directly against containerd with a full Linux system.

This presented a problem which I’d not really encountered before - Docker and Kubernetes on my Mac were no longer enough, I needed a full Linux environment, and so did the community.

This is how it went and what we learned along the way.

Linux lists.busybox.net

Understanding bin, sbin, usr/bin, usr/sbin

This post to the BusyBox mailing list from back in 2010 was a fun read to get the backstory on bin, sbin, usr/bin, and usr/sbin.

You know how Ken Thompson and Dennis Ritchie created Unix on a PDP-7 in 1969?
Well around 1971 they upgraded to a PDP-11 with a pair of RK05 disk packs (1.5
megabytes each) for storage.

When the operating system grew too big to fit on the first RK05 disk pack (their
root filesystem) they let it leak into the second one
, which is where all the
user home directories lived (which is why the mount was called /usr). They
replicated all the OS directories under there (/bin, /sbin, /lib, /tmp…) and
wrote files to those new directories because their original disk was out of
space. When they got a third disk, they mounted it on /home and relocated all
the user directories to there so the OS could consume all the space on both
disks and grow to THREE WHOLE MEGABYTES (ooooh!).

Productivity github.com

The Tomboy note-taking application is still alive

Around the same time I started using Ubuntu I found Tomboy and it was a note-taking system unlike anything else I’d ever used. To me it was the great differentiator for the Linux desktop for a bit. It is a desktop-wiki that provides some incredibly interesting concept. I thought it had quietly passed away but it turns out it has been ported to a new stack and lives a good life with support for Mac and Windows under the Tomboy NG name.

The Tomboy note-taking application is still alive

Security securitylab.github.com

How to get root on Ubuntu 20.04 by pretending nobody’s /home

Kevin Backhouse:

I am a fan of Ubuntu, so I would like to help make it as secure as possible. I have recently spent quite a bit of time looking for security vulnerabilities in Ubuntu’s system services, and it has mostly been an exercise in frustration…

This blog post is about an astonishingly straightforward way to escalate privileges on Ubuntu. With a few simple commands in the terminal, and a few mouse clicks, a standard user can create an administrator account for themselves. I have made a short demo video, to show how easy it is.

This particular vulnerability is regarding the GUI, so your Ubuntu servers are unaffected. Still, 👀

Hayden Barnes boxofcables.dev

No, Microsoft is not rebasing Windows to Linux

Hayden Barnes explains how Windows and Linux exist in a “cosmic duality” and whether or not Microsoft will ever “shift the core of the Windows operating system to the Linux kernel.”

I have a unique perspective on Microsoft’s Linux involvement. I help deliver Ubuntu on Windows Subsystem for Linux in my job at Canonical. … I have become somewhat of an intermediary between the Microsoft and Linux communities. It is something I am glad to do. There are creative, kind, and fascinating people in both communities. Interesting things happen when the lines between them blur. Fostering cross-pollination will make computing better for everyone.

Linux darlinghq.org

Darling lets you run macOS software on Linux

Darling is a lot like Wine only for macOS.

It implements a complete Darwin environment, runs macOS software directly without requiring a hardware emulator, and aims to integrate apps into the Linux desktop experience.

The only downside is they haven’t quite gotten GUI apps working yet:

This took us a lot of time and effort, but we finally have basic experimental support for running simple graphical applications. It requires some special setup for now though, so do not expect it to work out of the box just yet. We’re working on this; stay tuned!

Opensource.com Icon Opensource.com

Use systemd timers instead of cronjobs

Is it time to migrate away from cron?

Like cron jobs, systemd timers can trigger events—shell scripts and programs—at specified time intervals, such as once a day, on a specific day of the month (perhaps only if it is a Monday), or every 15 minutes during business hours from 8am to 6pm. Timers can also do some things that cron jobs cannot. For example, a timer can trigger a script or program to run a specific amount of time after an event such as boot, startup, completion of a previous task, or even the previous completion of the service unit called by the timer.

Linux k1ss.org

KISS – a Linux distro focused on simplicity

To say KISS isn’t for everybody would be a massive understatement. After all, it only targets x86-64 architecture and the English language. To say KISS is the first unique take on Linux I’ve seen in a long time would be 💯 on target.

Here are a few of my favorites from its “feature” list:

  • Every installation of the distribution contains the full sources (of the distribution) with git history attached.
  • Is simple and small enough to be maintainable in its entirety by a single person with little effort.
  • There is no “backend”. This distribution is merely a few git repositories.

And it looks rad too.

KISS – a Linux distro focused on simplicity

Dmitri Popov coffeecode.camera

Towards an efficient photographic workflow on Linux

Dmitri Popov:

digiKam is the cornerstone of my photographic workflow. This powerful and versatile photo management application has all the tools and features necessary for transferring, organizing, processing, and managing photos, RAW files, and videos. But even though digiKam can handle practically any photographic task you throw at it, there is still room for optimizing and improving parts of the Linux-based photographic workflow.

Linux github.com

NymphCast – an audio/video casting system with support for custom apps

NymphCast is a software solution which turns your choice of Linux-capable hardware into an audio and video source for a television or powered speakers. It enables the streaming of audio and video over the network from a wide range of client devices, as well as the streaming of internet media to a NymphCast server, controlled by a client device.

In addition, it supports powerful apps (NymphCast apps) written in AngelScript to extend the functionality of NymphCast with a variety of online services.

NymphCast – an audio/video casting system with support for custom apps

Linux fedoramagazine.org

Announcing Fedora CoreOS general availability

Fedora CoreOS is a container-focused (mostly) immutable Linux distribution designed to be lightweight and secure. It features Ignition as an early-boot-provisioning systems that alleviates all post-boot configuration, OSTree as an atomic-update mechanism, and podman as a secure and daemon-less container runtime.

If you’ve ever asked yourself WHY you need to SSH in to configure a system, why your cloud server OS comes with inkjet printer packages, or how you can get out of the burden of critical but uninspired kernel updates… then check out Fedora CoreOS!

The New Stack Icon The New Stack

WireGuard VPN protocol coming the Linux kernel soon

Dan Guido mentioned this might be a thing on our Algo VPN episode. Turns out he was right (once version 5.6 of the Linux kernel hits package mirrors for download).

Linus had this to say about WireGuard:

“Can I just once again state my love for it and hope it gets merged soon? Maybe the code isn’t perfect, but I’ve skimmed it, and compared to the horrors that are OpenVPN and IPSec, it’s a work of art,”

The New Stack Icon The New Stack

Deploy a pod on CentOS with Podman

If you’ve been following along in the open source news cycle lately, you’ve probably heard that Red Hat has dropped the docker container runtime engine from both its Red Hat Enterprise Linux (RHEL) and CentOS Linux distributions.

I must not be following along, because that’s news to me.

That being the case, what do you do when you need to deploy containers? Fortunately, they’ve created a near drop-in replacement for docker, called Podman.

Podman is a rename from kpod, sorta. The new thing is actually called libpod, and Podman exists as the CLI for that library. It’s all a bit confusing, but what’s cool is none of this requires a daemon like the Docker Engine.

If you’d like to give it a go, this walk-through by The New Stack will get you started.

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